The Jenner effect: seven lessons we can learn from Caitlyn

JennerSome stories are unavoidable. As much as one tries to ignore it, some stories keep finding their way into your daily routine. It constantly pops up on your Twitter feed and Facebook timeline. It leads the morning and nightly newscasts. It’s on the front page of your daily paper (both physical and digital). It’s all that anyone is talking about at work, and whispering about at church. Caitlyn Jenner’s coming out has become a constant fixture in my world all week long. As this clearly could be a defining moment in American pop culture, her story shouldn’t be relegated to salacious gossip or redundant punch lines. Believe it or not, there are some real lessons to be learned:

Sisterhood is a universal concept

Femaleness and femininity have always been packaged in very traditional, universally accepted ideas about what it means to be a woman. The transgendered experience blows all of those notions to smithereens. Feminists are now challenged with finding a way to reach out to sisters like Janet Mock, Laverne Cox, and, yes, Caitlyn Jenner, embrace their unique journey and build solidarity with their struggle. Sisterhood is not only powerful, but it’s becoming more diverse.

The “T” in the LGBT community is just as important as the L,G, and B

We rattle off the LGBT acronym so often in our modern vernacular that we tend to forget that LGBT represents four very unique experiences. Many times someone will say LGBT, but they really mean lesbian and gay. This particular moment in our culture is forcing us to pay much closer attention to the “T” as an experience very different from lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

Pretty takes work

Hormone therapy and plastic surgery can provide the basics needed to be deemed female; but getting cover-of-Vanity-Fair glamorous takes “more than a notion”, as my grandmother would say. It’s truly a team effort. But don’t be fooled, the transgendered lifestyle is much more than a grown-up version of playing dress up.

Gender is more complicated than we ever imagined

The sheer variety of reactions to Caitlyn’s story proves this lesson to be true. You could ask 100 different people their opinion of Caitlyn Jenner and you will likely get 100 different replies. We are discovering that the concept of gender goes far beyond what we learned in seventh grade sex-ed. Much like sexuality, gender is fluid and more connected to our brains than our reproductive organs.

Don’t wait to be happy

One of the more hotly debated aspects of Jenner’s reveal has been her age. Many openly wonder “why now at age 65?” The more profound question may be “why not?” Why would any human choose to live in a constant state of misery and yearning? Why do so many of us choose the numbing familiarity that comes with living up to others expectations over the unbridled joy of being comfortable in your own skin? It takes an uncommonly brave person to claim their own version of happy in the face of a mountain of certain criticism, judgment, and ridicule. This brings us to the next lesson…

Courage isn’t one size fits all

America loves a hero—a hero that fits our mythology. We love the soldier returning from war; the firefighter that runs back into a burning building; the world class Olympian who shatters records and becomes the pride of a nation. Bruce Jenner fits that mold, but Caitlyn displays a very different brand of valor. Hers is an unconventional courage born from the fearlessness and determination required to live life on one’s own terms. It’s definitely not what we’re used to, but it’s honorable nonetheless.

At the end of the day, it still all comes down to the money

Caitlyn is an anomaly; but not because she was born a man. There are thousands of transgendered citizens here in the U.S. She is a rarity because she is one of the very fortunate few who have both the monetary means and moral support necessary to foster a safe and emotionally healthy transition. A great deal of transgendered women (especially transgendered women of color) are relegated to lives of back-alley medical procedures, rejection, and poverty. With any luck, the spotlight shining on Caitlyn might also shine a light on the plight of the mass of transgendered women who still live in the margins of society.

No matter what opinion you may hold of Jenner, she is representative of the brave, new world that awaits us. This month hundreds of prominent American cities are planning spectacular Gay Pride celebrations and it is widely expected that marriage equality will be the law of the land by the end of the summer. This expansion of freedom is viewed by many as progress, and viewed by some as a threat. Change is often uncomfortable and usually challenging; but it’s almost always necessary.

 

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Cyber Security It’s Your Responsibility

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Today’s world is heavily influenced by technology and digital media, making cyber security a hot topic, especially for the federal government in light of the recent hack to the Office of Personnel Management system. Cyber security is about protecting personal information and communication by preventing, detecting and responding to attacks, according to the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team. According to Sam Grimes, team lead of the Network Enterprise Center Cyber Security Compliance Branch, “employees need to be vigilant and remember the tips from their annual security trainings.” Employees should always: • Practice OPSEC when away from the office. • Treat personally identifiable information as protected information. • Encrypt PII when transmitting via e-mail. • Ensure only trusted websites are visited and links within e-mails are only opened from trusted sources. • Bring laptops into the office on a monthly basis so the assets can be scanned and security findings remediated. As the Fort Detrick community prepares for an upcoming cyber security inspection, it is important to remember to be vigilant about the measures in place to protect personal information, as well as the local networks on post. “Attackers are looking for a way to get in. The smallest thing we […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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US Spy Chief James Clapper Says China ‘Lead Suspect’ In Cyber Hack

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A US Intelligence Chief, James Clapper, has accused China of being a “leading suspect” in the massive hack of a US government agency holding the personnel records of millions of Americans. Clapper is the highest-ranking US official to publicly implicate Beijing since news of the data breach emerged. The statement comes after three days of high-level talks in which China and the US agreed to a “code of conduct”. Media report says China always dismissed suggestions that it was behind the hacking. Speaking at a conference in Washington DC, Mr Clapper said: ”China remains the leading suspects, but the US government continues to investigate.” It is also reported that on June 5, the US Office of Personnel Management said that more than four million employees, retirees, contractors and job applicants may have had their personal data compromised. Meanwhile, the US Secretary of State, John Kerry, has said that China and the US would come up with a code of cyber conduct. He said, ”There was an honest discussion, without accusations, without any finger-pointing, about the problem of cyber theft and whether or not it was sanctioned by government or whether it was hackers and individuals that the government has the […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Learning from Mistakes: What These 4 Big Data Breaches Teach Us

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Nobody is perfect. Everyone makes mistakes, and anyone can fail — especially in the business world. IBM’s “2015 Cost of Data Breach Study” shows that the average total cost of a data breach is $3.8 million, representing a 23 percent increase since 2013. The cost for each lost or stolen record increased 6 percent, from a consolidated average of $145 to $154. Several companies also have been sued for their negligence in preventing these attacks. Data breaches are huge failures, but taking a look at these four big ones can teach us a thing or two about how to better secure our data. 1. Home Depot The largest home improvement chain in the world suffered a breach that resulted in compromised credit and debit card information for 5.6 million Home Depot customers in September 2014. Then in November of that year, about 53 million email addresses were stolen. The company said that the hackers used a third-party source to enter the Home Depot network, and then installed malware affecting the self-checkout systems. This data breach involved credit and debit cards, along with customer’s personal information. Most of these breaches occur where the “swipe and sign” or magnetic strip method of reading […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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How to find the best cyber security insurance for your firm

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

A robust cyber security insurance policy can be tricky to procure, even for the most meticulous wealth management firms. Interest in cyber insurance has surged over the past year following a number of high-profile hackings, including one announced earlier this month involving the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. In response, many industries and the financial services industry in particular, have stepped up their vigilance against cyber crimes. Last year, financial institutions raised by nearly 20 percent the total limits of their cyber coverage with Marsh, a global insurance broker and unit of Marsh & McLennan Cos, to an average of $23.5 million. Premiums for a $10 million policy at financial institutions with under $1 billion in revenue can run between $150,000 to $175,000 per year, according to Marsh. Insurance coverage would help offset the financial burdens of a cyber attack, covering everything from notifying customers to hiring technology experts. About 50 insurance carriers offer cyber insurance in the United States, including Ridge Insurance Solutions, a global insurance company launched in October by former Department of Homeland Security (DHS) secretary Tom Ridge. More than 60 percent of brokerages examined during a Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) review of brokerages’ cyber security practices […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Why your bank may not care if your credit card was hacked

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Some banks are putting hacked credit and debit cards on watch lists, rather than replacing the cards. Credit and debit card fraud cost the U.S. $6.15 billion last year, up 12.4% from the previous year, according to The Nilson Report industry newsletter. So you’d think the financial services industry, which shoulders most of the cost, would be proactive about quashing the use of stolen card data. But it may not make financial sense for your bank to replace your card—even if it knows the card has been compromised. That’s because hacks go down in phases. One set of cyber attackers steals the information—say, by hacking into a major retailer like Target TGT -0.41% or Home Depot HD 0.53% . Those thieves sell that purloined plastic—or, more specifically, the data behind it—on online black markets and crime forums. There, a final set of fraudsters purchases the data to make unauthorized transactions. It’s an assembly line for digital iniquitousness. If your payment card information hovers in limbo between those stages—up for sale on a baleful bazaar, but not yet in the hands of those anchor leg crooks—your bank may know it, because security firms trawl the “carder” underworld to compile lists of […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Facebook Inc Hires Yahoo! Alex Stamos As Chief Security Officer

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) has hired Alex Stamos as its new chief security officer, according to a Facebook post from Wednesday. Since last year, Mr. Stamos has served as chief information security officer at Yahoo! Inc. (NASDAQ:YHOO). The need to fill the vacancy for security personnel at Facebook arose after ride-sharing startup Uber poached its security executive, Joe Sullivan, in April. In the Facebook post, Mr. Stamos explained the reason for joining the social media titan. He wants to focus on building secure products to help provide opportunities for educational, economical, and personal purposes, to underprivileged people around the world; especially those in developing countries. He wrote: “There is no company in the world that is better positioned to tackle the challenges faced not only by today’s Internet users but for the remaining [two-thirds] of humanity we have yet to connect.” It is somewhat clear that his decision to switch employers was neither due to being mistreated at Yahoo nor because his previous employer went against his actions related to cyber security. The new chief security executive does not only wish to tighten up privacy and security measures, but also wants to work toward providing opportunities to the under-served areas of […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Business profile: gospel singer/songwriter LJaye

 

singer songwriter LJayeLawrence “LJaye” James is a gospel singer and songwriter from Atlanta, Georgia.  At an early age, he discovered his gift for creating music. As the son of a Pastor and Evangelist, he knew he possessed something greater than talent; he possessed the anointing of God, which allowed his voice to be used as God’s instrument through ministry. Through song, LJaye brings the spirit and glory of God wherever he ministers, whether in church, a concert, or on the street corner.

LJaye began his music career in R&B, where he was privileged to work with some of the music industry’s biggest R&B and pop artists and producers, such as singer T-Boz from theSinger Songwriter LJaye hit group TLC, mega hit producer Dallas Austin, and producer Rondeau “Duke” Williams. He has had the privilege to open for R&B star and gospel artist, Kelly Price as well as performed at the historic Apollo Theatre, where he won the competition after charming the infamous audience.

Once LJaye began working on his debut R&B album, he discovered that God had a different plan for him. After rebelling against his parents request to get back into the church and sing gospel music, LJaye found himself in trouble several times with the law and eventually was incarcerated. LJaye could no longer run from his calling and felt the presence of the Lord in his jail cell. It was there in that cell, where he wrote his hit single, “Before I Was Saved” the story of his testimony. LJaye re-dedicated his life to the Lord and vowed to do God’s work and promised to fulfill his parent’s wishes.

 

Singer songwriter LJayeAs LJaye found himself basking in the presence of God, his heart began to fill with songs that were birthed from his struggles, pain, defeat, and victories. Realizing that so many people can relate to his story, but are not connected to the Lord, he decided to get back into the studio to record his debut gospel album titled, “Before I Was Saved” in an effort to reach the unreached. The album was released on LJaye’s record label JayeHill Records, which he founded with his partner and music industry veteran Bobby Hill, former Vice President of Maurice Starr Enterprises (New Edition and New Kids On The Block). LJaye also enlisted producer, friend, and long time collaborator, Rondeau “Duke Williams to produce several songs on the album, as well as Courtney “CL” Horton (Deitrick Haddon and Damitia Haddon) and Larry “Detroit” Nix (R. Kelly & Gucci Man) to bring a gospel, R&B, pop, and hip hop influenced sound to compliment his message and lyrics to give non-church goers a familiar sound to deliver the word of God.

LJaye desires to use his platform to implement God’s work in an effort to reach the masses and bring them into the Kingdom of God. He is currently working on a new single that is scheduled to be released later this year.

Atlanta Free Speech salutes LJaye.

Connect with LJaye: Twitter, Facebook, Website

Make sure you download “Before I Was Saved” on iTunes.

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Microsoft employee: Samsung is disabling Windows Security Update feature

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Samsung is allegedly shipping notebooks and laptops with a custom software updater that disables Windows Updates without users consent leaving them unsecured, it has been revealed. Microsoft support engineer, Patrick Barker, was the one who, while analyzing a user’s system registry, discovered that Samsung’s SW Update tool used a program called “Disable_Windowsupdate.exe” to intentionally disable Microsoft’s built in update system for Windows. He found that attempting to re-enable Windows Update didn’t help, as Samsung’s software would simply disable the Microsoft update tool again upon rebooting. Samsung’s software is an OEM updating tool that updates the system’s drivers and keeps third-party utilities (bloatware) installed, while the Windows update in question is responsible for delivering bug fixes, driver updates, program updates and crucial security patches for Microsoft’s operating system. The update’s absence will leave holes discovered in Windows unfixed and as a result the systems would become vulnerable to attack by cyber criminals, viruses and hacking. Barker has documented his discovery in his own blog. “Windows Update remains a critical component of our security commitment to our customers. We do not recommend disabling or modifying Windows Update in any way as this could expose a customer to increased security risks. We are […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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86 percent of websites at risk from hackers, says WhiteHat

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Even though software bugs such as Heartbleed and Shellshock exposed weaknesses in hundreds of thousands of company websites, many are still vulnerable to being hacked. Data from a recent study by WhiteHat Security which examined the vulnerabilities of more than 30,000 websites showed the majority of organisations have some kind of weakness in their systems. WhiteHat found that 86 per cent of all websites tested had at least one flaw considered serious enough to potentially allow a hacker to take control over all, or some part, of the website, compromise user accounts on the system, access sensitive data, violate compliance requirements, and possibly make headline news. There were also 56 per cent of websites that had more than one of these vulnerabilities. Of the sectors WhiteHat studied, the report found 55 per cent of retail trade sites, 50 per cent of healthcare and social assistance sites, and 35 per cent of finance and insurance sites were always vulnerable to a serious breach. Transport layer protection, which is a protocol that ensures communications security over a computer network, was the most likely vulnerability on their websites. Jeremiah Grossman, founder of WhiteHat Security, says: “This year’s report has shown that the amount […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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