Dark web black markets turning mobsters into cyber crooks

Dark web black markets turning mobsters into cyber crooks



  Organised criminal groups are leveraging dark web services, cyber black markets and crypto currencies to digitise their real-world money laundering, information theft and child pornography operations, according to Europol. The Europol European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) issued the warning in […]

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U of M researchers find traffic lights can be hacked

U of M researchers find traffic lights can be hacked



    Have you ever watched a movie where a snarky young computer hacker wreaks havoc with civic infrastructure, and wondered if it could happen in real life? Read More….

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Sri Lanka Highly Vulnerable to Cyber Attacks

Sri Lanka Highly Vulnerable to Cyber Attacks



Sri Lanka will experience a massive wave of cyber attacks in the near future due to inadequate prevention methods and privacy laws as well as non-compliance, according to the state’s Computer Emergency Response Team Co-ordination Centre. (CERT|CC). “In Sri Lanka, […]

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Over 90 million hacker attacks registered in Russian Internet since 2010

Over 90 million hacker attacks registered in Russian Internet since 2010



  More than 90 million hacker attacks have been registered in the Russian segment of the Internet since 2010, Secretary of the Russian Security Council Nikolay Patrushev said on Wednesday. “There have been 57 million attacks since 2014 and approximately 90 […]

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Attorney General urges tech companies to leave device backdoors open for police

Attorney General urges tech companies to leave device backdoors open for police



  Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said on Tuesday that new forms of encryption capable of locking law enforcement officials out of popular electronic devices imperil investigations of kidnappers and sexual predators, putting children at increased risk. “It is […]

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Four hackers indicted for breaking into Valve and Microsoft servers

main-justice-building_1

The Department of Justice has announced that four hackers both inside and outside the U.S. have been indicted for stealing trade secrets — including video game source code — from the U.S. government as well as Valve, Epic Games, Microsoft, and Zombie Studios.

Their hack netted them data including source code and trade secrets, government prosecutors allege, worth between $100 and $200 million. The DOJ says that the group conspired to sell the information it obtained from the hacks — and it has so far seized over $620,000 in cash and “other proceeds.”

The government has charged four individuals in the hack so far: Nathan Leroux, 20, of Bowie, Maryland; Sanadodeh Nesheiwat, 28, of Washington, New Jersey; David Pokora, 22, of Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; and Austin Alcala, 18, of McCordsville, Indiana. An unnamed Australian citizen has also been charged in Australia.

Charges include conspiracies to commit computer fraud, copyright infringement, wire fraud, mail fraud, identity theft and theft of trade secrets, as well as individual charges of aggravated identity theft, unauthorized computer access, copyright infringement and wire fraud.

Pokora and Nesheiwat today plead guilty to the government’s charges today.

According to the DOJ, the hackers used SQL injection and stolen user accounts to gain access to networks. Once there, they grabbed an Apache helicopter pilot training program developed by Blacklight: Retribution studio Zombie; data about Xbox Live and the technical specifications for the Xbox One prior to its release from Microsoft; an early version of Gears of War 3 from Epic; and an early version of Call of Duty 3 (presumably from Microsoft, again, as there’s no mention of an attack on Activision’s servers.)

It’s unclear what was stolen from Valve, specifically, but the government says that the hackers stole trade secrets, games and source code, as well as confidential financial and employee information from the companies they targeted.

“Today’s guilty pleas show that we will protect America’s intellectual property from hackers, whether they hack from here or from abroad,” said said Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell, in a statement. According to the DOJ, this is the first time a foreign individual has been convicted for hacking into a U.S. company and stealing trade secrets — in the case of Pokora, who is Canadian.

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/226771/Four_hackers_indicted_for_breaking_into_Valve_and_Microsoft_servers.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+GamasutraNews+%28Gamasutra+News%29

NSA claims of Snowden leaks aiding terrorists found unwarranted

An independent investigation on the effects of whistle blower Edward Snowden’s leaks of NSA documents reveals that the claims — often referred to as overblown by some critics –that Al Qaida and ISIS benefitted from those revelations are not true.

A new independent investigation by Flashpoint Global Partners (FGP) reveals that despite the claims by the National Security Agency (NSA), documents leaked by whistle blower Edward Snowden did not damage America’s National Security by alerting Al Qaida they were being spied on. There have been no real consequences and Al Qaida has not changed the way they communicate because of the leaks. Al Qaida changed the way they communicate long before the revelations by Snowden.

Despite the independent findings, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper — who came under fire for admittedly lying to the U.S. Congress — is now claiming that Snowden’s leaks also aided in the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and assisted Russia’s alleged occupation of Crimea. Contrary to Clapper’s insinuations that Snowden aided Al Qaida and Washington’s claims that Snowden damaged National Security there is little evidence supporting those claims as being factual.

FGP’s investigation suggests that none of those things are true and that Al Qaida has been well aware of encryption and how to use it because they knew they were already being spied on. Long before Snowden began leaking the information Al Qaida and other terrorist groups were already encrypting their communications. In fact, Al Qaida was using encryption long before 9/11. Snowden’s leaks only confirmed what Al Qaida knew all along — that their communications were targeted by the NSA.

Snowden’s leaks started going public June 05, 2013. FGP’s analysis of the leaks challenge all the assertions made by the U.S. government, noting that there is no correlation between Snowden’s leaks and the impact on the revelations about the NSA’s spying. Other Islamic groups, including ISIS, have simply extended their existing encryption schemes to new devices and technologies including cell phones, chat software and texting. Regardless of the FGP’s findings, corporations associated with the U.S. government are still attempting to frame Snowden as a traitor.

The investigation by FGP focused on the significance of several online communications encryption tools released by Jihadi-affiliated groups once the leaks started by Snowden. FGP used proprietary software they developed to mine the dark web for open source information posted in top Jihadi social networking platforms looking for evidence that Snowden’s revelations had a measurable impact on the logistical subterfuge technologies of terrorist organizations and found very little information indicating Snowden’s leaks caused Al Qaida to develop more secure digital communications and/or encryption.

According to the FGP’s analysts Juhadists didn’t care about Snowden’s revelations. They were more interested in discussing newly released encryption software that was tailored to their cause. The report from FGP goes on to list various secure communications packages Jihadists used, noting that a definitive answer to the relevance of Snowden’s leaks is only possible with access to “classified information or other credible sources that reveal the inner workings of terrorist organizations.” Results of the study were also limited due to the lack of access to those responsible for providing Jihadi encryption software.

USA Defends NSA Spying But Won’t Explain

national-security-nsa

Even if there were evidence that a domestic spying program was unconstitutional, interference by the courts could cause “exceptionally grave damage” to national security, the government told a federal judge.
Urging U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White to deny the plaintiffs partial summary judgment and instead rule for the government, the Monday filing from the Department of Justice says that the National Security Administration’s information-collecting techniques do not violate the Fourth Amendment.
The filing comes in the case Jewel v. NSA, a high-profile domestic spying case filed in 2008 by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. It stems from a 2006 revelation by a former AT&T technician that the company was routing copies of emails, Web browsing data and other Internet information to a secret NSA-controlled location in San Francisco.
In the July motion for partial summary judgment, the EFF said that the NSA seizes and searches Internet communications without a warrant, in violation of the Fourth Amendment.
“Defendants are conducting an ongoing program of bulk, untargeted seizure of the Internet communications of millions of innocent Americans,” the motion says.
Even though the NSA sometimes obtains orders from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, those orders “are simply not warrants,” the motion says.
Such orders neither specify nor limit NSA searches, and the court does not look for probable cause or even a reasonable suspicion that the NSA will turn up any foreign intelligence information, the privacy advocates argue.
But the government said Monday that the plaintiffs’ arguments “are not supported by evidence.”
The expert declarations by an AT&T whistle-blower and a former Federal Communications Commission adviser “rest on hearsay and speculation about activities that allegedly occurred in 2002 and 2003,” the filing states. Those declarations do not prove anything about whether AT&T customers’ communications are being gathered now, the government added.
Acknowledgment by the NSA that it has a method of collecting certain data also does not negate the classified status that shields the details of how that program – known as “Upstream” – works, the government said.
Noting that it cannot disclose how the program works without “risking exceptionally grave damage to national security,” the government said that the state-secrets doctrine requires dismissal of the plaintiff’s claims.
The plaintiffs have described Upstream as a program by which the government taps the fiber-optic cables of telecommunications companies and copies the stream of data, including everything from emails to video calls.
The government allegedly has an “imprecise” system of weeding out domestic communication, while searching for, and only keeping, troublesome data.
While the EFF argues that the process of seizing and searching all that data is unconstitutional, the government says that there is ultimately no harm being done to the plaintiffs.
Because the plaintiffs are challenging communications that the NSA didn’t keep, there simply is no allegation that Upstream constitutes search and seizure, government attorneys say.
“In plaintiffs’ own telling, those unretained communications are copied, scanned, and then destroyed all within a matter of milliseconds, and they are never seen by any human being,” the cross-motion says. “The process plaintiffs allege does not meaningfully interfere with plaintiffs’ possessory interests in their online communications…Thus, no Fourth Amendment seizure or search occurs as a matter of law.”
White will hear EFF’s motion for summary judgment and the government’s cross-motion on Dec. 12.

 

http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/09/30/71961.htm

Call for Legislation on Cyber Security

Call for Legislation on Cyber Security



A seminar on “Security in Cyber Space: Implications and Challenges” organised by the Center for International Strategic Studies (CISS) brought together security and foreign policy experts, policy makers and members of the legal and technical community to discuss cyber security […]

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Japan Airlines Reports Hacker Attack

Japan Airlines Reports Hacker Attack



Japan Airlines Co. said it has become the latest target of hackers, with the information of up to 750,000 customers possibly stolen. The airline confirmed Monday it has found evidence of unauthorized access to its Customer Information Management System due […]

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