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THE TOP 10 WOMEN CYBER GUARDIANS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The paucity of women in math and science extends to the data security realm. Women make up 14 percent of federal government cyber personnel, according to a May (ISC)2 global information security workforce study. The number was even lower in the private sector as recently as 2013: 11 percent. But quantity does not equal quality. And there is top-notch talent gracing the field across government, academia and industry. Here is an unempirical roundup of 10 influential leaders in information security, who happen to be women. Ann Barron-DiCamillo, director, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team Susan Walsh/AP Oversees a round-the-clock watch center that collects, processes and shares information on cyberthreats with agencies and industry sectors. The disclosure of a theft of Office of Personnel Management files on 21.5 million national security-sensitive personnel and their families thrust her into the national spotlight — a position she was uncomfortable with as an evangelist of confidentiality. Testifying at a House hearing in June on U.S. CERT’s role in the response, she acknowledged, “Like many Americans, I too am a victim of these incidents . . . Although I am appearing today ready to provide information to this committee, I do so with […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post THE TOP 10 WOMEN CYBER GUARDIANS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Antrix website hack: Cyber security should become national priority, says Pawan Duggal

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hours after the website of Antrix, Indian Space Research Organisation’s commercial arm, was hacked, cyber law expert Pawan Duggal on Sunday said that cyber security should become a national priority. Hours after the website of Antrix, Indian Space Research Organisation’s commercial arm, was hacked, cyber law expert Pawan Duggal on Sunday said that cyber security should become a national priority. “This is not a normal hack. This has to be seen as a broader cyber war activities that are targeted against India..We have seen large number of attacks coming up on government websites. Who is behind this, we will have to wait and watch,” Duggal told ANI. “This should be enough to wake us up from complacency, we need to quickly realize that cyber security has to be number one national priority. Unfortunately, that is not the case. India still does not have dedicated legislation on cyber security, we have a very weak cyber law,” he added. Earlier in the day, the website of Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) commercial arm Antrix was hacked. The PRO of ISRO confirmed the same and said that there is some problem with the homepage of the Antrix website. Antrix Corporation Limited is the […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Antrix website hack: Cyber security should become national priority, says Pawan Duggal appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Attack as the best form of defence – should we consider unleashing cyber security teams’ offensive talents?

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Cyber crime cost the world economy $400bn in 2014, according to a report by McAfee. Whilst this only represents a small percentage of the global GDP, it’s a significant number. Meanwhile, the continuing increase in attacks represents a fundamental risk to many companies, having a tangible impact on share prices and the global economy. At a national level, governments are coming under increasing attacks that threaten critical infrastructure. On the flipside, some governments are becoming far more active in conducting cyber attacks, seeking to disrupt rivals’ economic and military capabilities. But enough is enough. Cyber criminals have it easy – they can strike a corporation with very little risk of being caught and prosecuted, particularly when operating within multiple legal jurisdictions. National governments, and the international community have failed to provide a way in which these criminals can be identified and brought to justice, leaving corporations – some of which provide critical services – at the mercy of attackers and with few options for response. Indeed, thanks to current UK legislation, businesses are being prevented from even basic measures that could have a major impact on their ability to respond to cyber attacks, requiring them to defend with both arms […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Attack as the best form of defence – should we consider unleashing cyber security teams’ offensive talents? appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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Who should take the fall after a corporate hack? It may soon be the CEO

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Data breaches can cost companies hundreds of millions of dollars, erode shareholder value, and indelibly tarnish corporate reputations. Yet, chief executives and other top brass at organizations that suffer such incidents have remained largely immune from the fallout. That may be changing. A new survey of 200 directors of public companies conducted by security firm Veracode and the New York Stock Exchange Governance Services shows that corporate boards have become much more serious about data breaches and are willing to hold top executives accountable for them. More than four in 10 of the directors in the survey felt that a company’s chief executive officer should take the rap for a data breach. When asked to prioritize who should be held accountable for such incidents, corporate boards ranked the chief executive officer first, followed by the chief information officer, and then the entire executive team. Chief information security officers, often the fall guys in a data breach situation, ranked fourth in the list – suggesting that directors get it that security executives can do only as well as the support and the resources they get from top management. Security has also become a growing priority for boards. In fact, 81 percent of […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Who should take the fall after a corporate hack? It may soon be the CEO appeared first on National Cyber Security.

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5 things you should know about being an ally

ally

Young activists and protesters at Woodruff Park protesting police brutality.

There is a lot of discussion these days about the role of allies in social justice movements. Allies are people who do not suffer directly from an injustice, but make it their duty to see that the injustice is addressed. Some examples are straight, cisgender, and normative allies of the LGBTIQ community, documented and citizen allies of the movement to end immigration discrimination, white allies of the anti-racism/BlackLivesMatter movement, men who are allies of the movement to end discrimination against women in the workplace, and able-bodied allies of the movement to end ableism or discrimination faced by people with disabilities. There are many different kinds of allies, and there is no right way to be an ally. Many allies have expressed frustration and confusion about what their roles should be in addressing issues of social justice and several articles have been posted online criticizing allies for various things. Being an ally is a really difficult thing to do, so here are five things that everyone should know about being an ally.

1. Being an ally is hard work.

Anyone who makes being an ally look easy has likely been an ally for a very long time. If you’re new to a movement, don’t be too hard on yourself. There is no right way of doing it. You’ll get heat from every direction, and you’ll often be confused about what your role should be. You’ll likely get it wrong many many times, but you have to keep trying. You’ll get better with time.

2. You’ll be criticized by non-allies.

One of the reasons that being an ally is difficult is because friends and family may not understand your decisions. Your recognition of your own privilege will almost certainly make them uncomfortable. Sometimes, depending on where you’re from, you may even temporarily lose some of your privilege in certain groups. And any sense of community you felt with those groups will be gone as well. When this happens, take refuge with other like-minded people.

3. You’ll be criticized even within the movement.

Lonnie King Jr., a civil rights activist from the Atlanta chapter of SNCC once said, to a group of students at a demonstration for undocumented college students, that sometimes during any movement for social justice we forget who the real enemy is. We get so caught up in the fight that we turn to the people next to us and criticize their battle techniques. He called this the circular shooting range. During the same lecture, Loretta Ross, the National Coordinator of SisterSong, talked about how to tell the difference between an enemy and a problematic ally and how important it is to pick your battles. This was fantastic advice. However, people don’t pick their battles, and your job as an ally is to take the heat and keep on fighting. When you’re an ally, you’re going to be criticized regardless of your good intentions. You’ll likely never fully earn the trust of every person that you work with. Your motives will always be questioned, and you’ll have to prove yourself again and again. You’ll likely face prejudice from the very people you wish to help. You’ll be told that you shouldn’t take part in certain things because you’re just an ally. You’ll be told you are part of the problem, that you aren’t doing enough, that you’ll never truly understand the struggle, etc. The sad thing is, most of these things will probably be true in some way, and that will weigh heavily on you. Recognizing the truth in the criticism you face is part of acknowledging your privilege. When this happens, always keep in mind that this weight is nothing in comparison to what people who are systematically oppressed face every single day. As an ally, it’s your job to realize this and to keep fighting and keep proving yourself.

4. Sometimes being in the minority will be uncomfortable for you, especially if you’re not accustomed to it.

For anti-racist white allies, for allies of the LGBTIQ community, for feminist men, and for any group of allies who are usually in the majority, being the only white person, the only straight person, or whatever it may be can be awkward and confusing at first. You’ll get used to it, and soon enough you won’t even notice anymore. Take this as a learning opportunity!

5. It’s part of your job as an ally to recruit other allies.

Use your privilege to facilitate hard conversations. One of the most important differences between the original civil rights movement and the anti-racism movement that’s happening today is that the goals for the first one were entirely policy-based. Most modern systematic oppression isn’t written into law the way segregation and discriminatory voting policies were.  Most systematic oppression happens because of the way we perceive people based on the color of their skin. Certain people are perceived as dangerous or criminal and therefore are subject to more encounters with racist police, harsher sentencing at the hands of racist judges, and more deaths at the hands of officers—and with no justice served because of racist juries. Most of these people who I’m describing as racist are probably very decent people. But they’re products of our society, a society where we are socialized to have certain perceptions of people based on how they look. It’s not a conscious decision, and many of us would like to believe it isn’t true. We can’t change this by passing laws or waiting on legislation. That’s what makes this movement different and why allies are more important than ever. While some groups are organizing to change laws and lobbying for better police officer training, most of the changes that need to be made have to start with hard conversations.

As an ally, you should use your privilege to make those conversations happen. People listen to speakers whom they identify with.  Regardless of what movement you’re an ally with, having difficult conversations with other privileged people is a great way to benefit the movement. It’s also one way that almost no one within the movement is going to criticize you for. Unlike many of the tactics for showing solidarity, openly critiquing one’s own privilege and educating others is almost always seen as an appropriate act for an ally.

In conclusion, being an ally is a very tough thing to do. It’s a full time job, but the rewards are extraordinary. There is no right way to do it, so someone will always be criticizing you. One important thing that you can do is listen. Find out who you trust and whose criticism matters. Always remember your original motive, and remind yourself of it when the going gets tough. Take solace in the community that you build with like-minded people. These are the people who matter. Everyone else is an ally yet to be recruited.

 

The post 5 things you should know about being an ally appeared first on Atlanta Free Speech.

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Hacker in a day: why you should learn how to hack a system

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Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

 Powered by Max Banner Ads  My name is third from the top on the dashboard. Next to it is a figure somewhere around 200,000 Hong Kong dollars — my bank balance — but I can’t quite keep track because the digits are repeatedly turning red and decreasing rapidly. My only way to combat the losses is to work faster than the eight other people on MacBooks at my table. In HK$15,000 increments, I’m stealing back the cash from their accounts and transferring it to mine. It’s a race to the top of the leaderboard, and every time my numbers turn crimson my face burns and my pulse races. I check the fitness tracker on my wrist. I’ve hit a cardio training heart rate of 139bpm. Hacking, it turns out, is quite a thrill. Monday saw the launch of a new course from London coding school Decoded. It’s called Hacker_in a day — the idea being that it will teach you some basic skills for cyber-attacking and thereby give you a sense of how easily your personal details could be accessed, your accounts infiltrated. After a quick lesson, we have each managed to experiment on an insecure online banking site until […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Why You Should Spy On Your Babysitter

In this Episode, Gregory Evans explains to parents why it is important to spy on your babysitters.  You also learn what hardware like spy cameras you will need to the mission.

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Gregory Evans Explains Why You Should Install Spyware On Your Childs Computer

Computer Security Expert and Ex-Hacker Gregory Evans explains to parents why you should install spyware on your childs computer and cell phone. View full post on Cyber Security News From The Real Experts Read More….

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Cell-Phone Fingerprint Ruling: 5 Things You Should Know

Cell-Phone Fingerprint Ruling: 5 Things You Should Know



With fingerprint-reading technology now being implemented in more and more smartphones, rulings like the one last week really get under people’s skin. Last Tuesday, a Virginia judge ruled that police officers can force a suspect to unlock a smartphone using […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

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Should Students Be Barred From Taking Cellphones to School?

Should Students Be Barred From Taking Cellphones to School?



New York City will be ending its longstanding ban on cellphones in public schools. For years the city argued that cellphones had no place in schools, and that they disrupted student learning. Many parents countered that cellphones were a vital […]

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