blog trackingRealtime Web Statistics Access Archives | Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant | Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant

Posts Tagged ‘Access’

Hacker Cracks Lumia Bootloader, Releases Tool To Grant Root Access For Custom ROMs

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hacker Cracks Lumia Bootloader, Releases Tool To Grant Root Access For Custom ROMs

Microsoft and Nokia have done a great job of making Lumia smartphones difficult to break into at a low-level, but software hacker Heathcliff has just proven that it’s not impossible. He’s just released a great-looking tool called Phone Internals, and it can do everything from unlocking the bootloader to replacing the phone’s ROM. Heathcliff welcomes donations by those who’ve found the tool useful. Based on the introduction video, it seems that a lot of effort went into this, and unlike most tools of this nature, detailed descriptions are found everywhere to ensure that you know exactly what’s going to happen once you click a button. According to the “Getting Started” section of the tool, supported models include Lumia 520, 521, 525, 620, 625, 720, 820, 920, 925, 928, 1020, and 1320. If your model is not on the list, don’t fret: Heathcliff has said that he hopes to add more models in the future. Even if you do have an appropriate PHONE ROM or run custom software, this tool could be used to root the device and give you the ability to back up the entire thing. Options are given to back up specific partitions, or everything en masse. Later, […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Hacker Cracks Lumia Bootloader, Releases Tool To Grant Root Access For Custom ROMs appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Teen hackers strike again, allegedly gain access to U.S. arrest records database

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Teen hackers strike again, allegedly gain access to U.S. arrest records database

A group of teenage hackers going by the name of “Crackas With Attitude” (CWA) are on a rampage, breaking into federal systems to embarrass the U.S. government. Network jobs are hot; salaries expected to rise in 2016 Wireless network engineers, network admins, and network security pros can expect above-average pay READ NOW After gaining access to the personal AOL email account of CIA Director John Brennan last month, the teenagers reportedly broke into the Comcast email account of FBI Deputy Director Mark Giuliana‘s wife, dumped personal details of thousands of government employees and then claimed to have gained access to the national Joint Automated Booking System, JABS, a database of arrest records, the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center and the FBI’s Virtual Command Center. “Cracka,” one of the hackers who also claims to be a stoner, told Motherboard the CWA targeted FBI Deputy Director Mark Giuliana because the FBI is investigating the hacker group and plans to “make an example” out of them. CWA “hacked” into the email account of Giuliana’s wife, found Giuliana’s phone number and then called him. Giuliana allegedly told Cracka, “I don’t know you but you better watch your back.” The hacker tweeted that Comcast and […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Teen hackers strike again, allegedly gain access to U.S. arrest records database appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Centrelink ‘tightens security’ as identity theft crimes to access welfare payments grow

6878542-3x2-340x227

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Ms Pearce-Stevenson’s remains were found in the Belanglo Forest in NSW in 2010, while the remains of her daughter Khandalyce, believed to be aged about two, were found near a suitcase alongside the Karoonda Highway in South Australia’s Murray Mallee earlier this year. A 41-year-old man has been charged over the alleged murder of Ms Pearce-Stevenson, while inquiries into who is responsible for Khandalyce’s death are continuing. Ms Pearce-Stevenson’s bank account is believed to have been accessed from four states over several years and her Centrelink benefits were also fraudulently claimed. Centrelink’s Department of Human Services general manager Hank Jongen said payments to Ms Pearce-Stevenson were cancelled in 2011 after detecting an issue. “Due to this being an active investigation I am unable to go into the specific details,” Mr Jongen said. “However, the payments were stopped in early 2011 because the department’s control system successfully identified a payment-affecting issue.” Senior research fellow at the University of Adelaide, Dr Malcolm Pattinson, said criminals could still easily exploit security holes in financial institutions. “Organisational security and that includes the financial institutions isn’t good enough,” he said. “There needs to be more security, more levels of identification I think in order to […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Centrelink ‘tightens security’ as identity theft crimes to access welfare payments grow appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Microsoft to bring low-cost broadband access to 500,000 Indian villages

At a dinner hosted in honor of Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella outlined the company’s plans to roll out low-cost internet access to 500,000 villages in India. The initiative will leverage the unused TV “white space” spectrum.

View full post on MobileNations

New Android lockscreen hack gives attackers full access to locked devices

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Software bugs that allow attackers to bypass smartphone lockscreens are common enough for both Android and iOS devices, but like a fender bender on the highway, many of us can’t resist the urge to gawk anyway. There’s a newly disclosed way for someone who has a few uninterrupted moments with a handset running most versions of Android 5.x to gain complete control of the device and all the data stored on it. The hack involves dumping an extremely long string into the password field after swiping open the camera from a locked phone. Unless updated in the past few days, devices running 5.0 to 5.1.1 will choke on the unwieldy number of characters and unlock, even though the password is incorrect. From there, the attacker can do anything with the phone the rightful owner can do. The following video demonstrates the attack in action. The technique begins by adding a large number of characters to the emergency call window and then copying them to the Android clipboard. (Presumably, there are other ways besides the emergency number screen to buffer a sufficiently large number of characters.) The hacker then swipes open the camera from the locked phone, accesses the options menu, and pastes the characters into the […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post New Android lockscreen hack gives attackers full access to locked devices appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Apple may face fines as it is refusing backdoor access to data

United States may fine Apple for refusing to create backdoor for data access

Apple may face problems same as Yahoo faced in 2007 when it refused to participate in the PRISM program,which set a precedent for non-compliance with government demands.

Apple may get in deep trouble as it has refused the government to give backdoor access to its database. This week, The New York Times reported that the Justice Dept. served Apple with a court order in a case “involving guns and drugs,” demanding it provide real-time access to iMessage, Apple’s proprietary service for sending messages between iPhones.The criminal case is under seal in an unidentified U.S. federal court.

Apple’s defiance comes at a time when the FBI is pushing for access to user data in the wake of the claims that the U.S. government had access to Silicon Valley systems through its PRISM surveillance program. In response to allegations it was complicit in spying on Americans, Apple quelled fears by revealing its iMessage texting and FaceTime calling services were encrypted and unable to be wiretapped, and said even it “cannot decrypt that data.” Around the same time, the company proceeded to offer device encryption, forcing feds to go directly to the suspect in question to get access to some user data.

Speaking to The Times, officials from the Justice Dept. and the FBI “advocate taking Apple to court,” though their motives are unclear. One possibility is that the government will demand that Apple creates some kind of backdoor, a move which chief executive Tim Cook said he would “never allow” to happen. Cook went on to say — presumably referring to the government — that “they have to cart us out in a box before we would do that.”

Despite Apple’s assurance that it it won’t — and can’t — create a backdoor for government access, security experts and researchers have claimed the contrary — specifically that Apple’s system has a weakness that could allow the government a way in.

Security researcher Nicholas Weaver last month outlined on legal blog Lawfare how Apple’s “sin-of-omission” allows the feds to wiretap iMessage conversations. The messaging system contains a flaw in how iPhone users verify each other, said Weaver. He refers to a “lurking security landmine” in how Apple allows users to backup messages to its cloud, which not only can be subpoenaed but is also turned on for users by default.

“The obvious flaw in this system is that the government could potentially force Apple to add an additional public key to your account, which would be analogous to registering an extra device,” said cryptography expert Matthew Green in an email. “Now everyone who sends you a message will be unknowingly encrypting an additional copy of the message to this new ‘ghost device.’ If the government runs that device, they can tap your messages.”

Simply put: Apple could be forced to allow the FBI to impersonate an iPhone user, which would in effect allow the agency to siphon off a suspect’s messages as they come in.

Green added that services like WhatsApp and Signal are “also vulnerable to similar attacks.”

“The real question is: could the government force Apple to do this against its will?” said Green. “Could a court force them to modify their technology in order to make eavesdropping possible?”

That’s a question which has been, to a degree, answered before.

Even if Apple says there is no way for it to create a backdoor, there’s always one other option the government has up its sleeve: the threat of heavy financial sanctions.

By sheer coincidence, it was exactly a year ago on September 11, 2014 that Yahoo was able — for the first time — to shed light on its secret FISA Court battle with the US government almost a decade earlier. The Bush administration was pushing the Web giant into “joining” the PRISM program, a move that Yahoo “refused to comply with what we viewed as unconstitutional and overbroad surveillance.”

The administration pushed for contempt, at which point Yahoo buckled. The company was faced with daily fines of $250,000 per day, which would double each month. By month five, Yahoo would have faced fines upwards of the entire U.S. national debt, and then some.

Could that happen to Apple, or any other company?

“The courts can effectuate their own orders and hold companies in contempt or impose sanctions,” said EFF staff attorney Andrew Crocker. “If you look at the litigation from 2007 that Yahoo was fighting in the [FISA Court]… that was an example of a fairly extreme attempt of a court trying to enforce its own order.”

A company like Apple with that much money — said to be more than $200 billion in cash — wouldn’t go down without a fight, and could potentially have a considerably negative effect on U.S. stock markets.

The Justice Dept.’s ongoing, sealed case against against Apple could escalate from the federal court it’s at now — if it hasn’t already — to the same secretive Washington DC-based surveillance court to which Yahoo was summoned. Security expert Bruce Schneier said in a recent blog post that there is “a persistent rumor going around that Apple is in the secret FISA Court, fighting a government order to make its platform more surveillance-friendly — and they’re losing.”

Apple has declined to comment on the record.

Because of the secretive nature of the FISA Court, we may never know if Apple has been, or will be in the future, forced to comply with a seemingly immoral or technologically impossible task.

Apple may have power and might, and more of the public on its side than any party in politics ever will, but the government has the power to bring that all crashing down by levying unreasonable and far-reaching financial sanctions.

The post Apple may face fines as it is refusing backdoor access to data appeared first on TechWorm.

View full post on TechWorm

How to access your Android phone’s hidden “Testing” menu

Most smartphone users rarely discover all the things that their handsets are capable of. But that’s OK: as long as a smartphone does what its owner wants it to do, there’s no real need for other things. Still, if you have the time and the curiosity to dig deeper into the insides of your phone’s software, you may find things that you didn’t know were there.

All mobile phones have some secret codes that don’t come with the manual, so it’s no wonder that such codes work on Android smartphones. We’ll now show you a code that reveals a hidden Android Testing menu (“testing” is literally the …

View full post on PhoneArena

EA Access members can own Battlefield 4: Naval Strike free for a limited time

EA Access is a great way to spend a few bucks a month on your Xbox One and members are being rewarded this month with ownership of an expansion for Battlefield 4. For a limited time, EA Access subscribers can snag the Naval Strike expansion pack completely free of charge. Perfect to play with Battlefield 4 being one of the titles in the vault.

View full post on MobileNations

Carphone Warehouse hackers gain access to millions of customer bank details

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Hackers have gained access to the personal details of 2.4 million people after cracking into Carphone Warehouse’s systems, the company has admitted. It announced that the IT systems of one of its UK divisions were found to have been breached on Wednesday, having been subjected to a “sophisticated cyber-attack” within the last fortnight. The division operates the the websites OneStopPhoneShop.com, e2save.com and Mobiles.co.uk. All three of the websites were offline on Saturday afternoon as details of the attack were made public. The Carphone Warehouse division also provides services to its recently launched iD mobile network, as well as to TalkTalk Mobile and Talk Mobile, around 480,000 customers of which may also be affected. Carphone Warehouse confessed that the personal data of as many as 2.4 million people may have been accessed by the hackers, including names, addresses, date of birth information and bank details. Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/epic/cpw/11791988/Carphone-Warehouse-hackers-gain-access-to-bank-details-of-2.4-million-customers.html

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Carphone Warehouse hackers gain access to millions of customer bank details appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Page 1 of 1012345»...Last »

My Twitter

  • Infatuation vs. Love: 14 Ways You Can Tell the Difference https://t.co/HeOIDWHK0H #dating @gregorydevans
    about 9 hours ago
  • OPW Interview With Michael Egan, CEO Of Spark Networks, During iDate Miami https://t.co/Ljw1gftfKS #dating @gregorydevans
    about 11 hours ago
  • 33 Interesting Words for Lovers, Breakups, and Fights https://t.co/bIvqkS8f1A #dating @gregorydevans
    about 21 hours ago
  • Cyber Security News Today is out! https://t.co/xEaxm4V4N5 @gregorydevans #hacker
    about 22 hours ago
  • 28 Turn-Ons for Girls That’ll Make Them Melt in Your Arms https://t.co/oY2iBIOPfP #dating @gregorydevans
    about 1 day ago

AmIHackerProof.com By Gregory D. Evans

Hacker For Hire By Gregory Evans

Gregory D. Evans On Facebook

Parent Securty By Gregory D. Evans

National Cyber Security By Gregory D. Evans

Dating Scams By Gregory Evans