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The algorithm of racism

algorithm of racism_Atlanta Free SpeechPerception is reality within our ever evolving, technology savvy society. The minute we hear a news story, curious minds flock to their mobile devices or computers to confirm via social media. This confirmation of events is ever so prevalent within the millennial generation where they are native searchers and only know research via online queries. Once a story is circulated on Facebook or Twitter, millions take this as gospel and share with their legions of friends and followers. Online searches and social media have such an impressionable mark on our overall views on society.

Recently Kabir Alli, a graduating senior from Clover Hill High School in Midlothian, VA posted a video clip on Twitter of a Google image search of “three black teenagers” which provided a host of young African-American mugshots. He and his friends then searched “three white teenagers” and found groups of smiling, happy people. This imagery perpetuates online racial stereotypes which persist in our social conscious and feeds racist rhetoric. Ultimately, the images are an extension of what is reported daily on broadcast networks and other media. Our society truly believes that young African-Americans are nothing more than thugs behind bars and Whites are the only race that can live productive, happy lives. Millennials are extremely impressionable and this visual only cements this racist untruth.

To date, this Twitter post has been shared over 65,000 times and Twitter users are using the hashtag #threeblackteenagers to discuss their thoughts on the video. The conversation regarding online racism has become increasingly prevalent recently due to the Brock Turner rape case. Turner, a white former Stanford University student was convicted in a high profile sexual assault case. Instead of using his mugshot, media outlets circulated his high school yearbook picture. The perception of Turner is protected by using his carefree high school portrait vs portraying him as the convicted rapist that he is. Minority youth have to be aware of this double standard and learn to combat racist stereotypes through education as well as strong self-esteem.

Racial online bias is an ongoing issue that has persisted for many years. Google’s explanation is that it is only providing the biases that currently exist in society and how people search online. In a statement, Google responded that its image search results are a reflection of what is on the internet, including the frequency with which certain types of images appear and how they are described. Google feels that they are not in control of their algorithm. This is a billion dollar company and they want the general public to believe that they are not in control of the most imperative aspect of their company. One has to question their logic and push them to correct this dangerous cultural issue. This is where the push for diversity comes into play to address the problem head on.

Kabir Alli should be applauded for bringing this issue to the forefront and demanding change. Technology and access is the bridge that provides society with insight into the ever evolving world we live.

The post The algorithm of racism appeared first on Atlanta Free Speech.

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IEEE Projects 2013 | An Approach Secret Sharing Algorithm in Cloud Computing Security over Single


IEEE Projects 2013 | An Approach Secret Sharing Algorithm in Cloud Computing Security over Single to Multi Clouds More Details: Visit http://clickmyproject.c…

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Reveal Imaging to test a homemade explosive algorithm for TSA

Jacob Goodwin Top Priority Sector:  cbrne_detection Read More….

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NIST chooses winner in secure hash algorithm competition

Mark Rockwell Top Priority Sector:  cyber_security NIST said “catch-ack” in selecting a new algorithm that could be used as part of a secure foundation for future information technologies. The agency announced the winner of its five-year-long Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA-3) Competition on Oct. 2, choosing “Keccak”  –   which it said is pronounced “catch-ack”  –  created […]

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RSA denies flaws in security algorithm

After having its flagship RSA crypto system called flawed this week by prominent researchers in a paper they made available online, EMC’s RSA security division struck back by saying the paper’s results don’t indicate a fundamental flaw in the RSA algorithm but more likely a problem with implementing it.

“On Feb. 14th, a research paper was submitted for publication stating that an alleged flaw has been found in the RSA encryption algorithm,” RSA said. “Our analysis confirms to us that the data does not point to a flaw in the algorithm, but instead points to the importance of proper implementation, especially regarding the exploding number of embedded devices that are connected to the Internet today.”

Ari Juels, chief scientist for RSA, said “the study is useful” as it pertains to the “failures of crypto protocols during random number generation”. But he faults its core idea that the RSA algorithm is somehow fundamentally flawed.

“I’d say all cryptography relies on good true random number generation. And when that goes wrong, the protocol breaks,” Juels says. He faults the conclusions of the paper that there was something intrinsically wrong with the RSA algorithm. The paper might have found that the RSA algorithm “might be a little less robust than another one,” but “it’s obviously not a problem with the RSA algorithm, it’s the way the keys were generated.”

He said this is not an issue that goes unrecognised today in industry, and Intel is in fact building a fast random number generator in its upcoming Ivy Bridge chip.

In its formal statement, RSA did not dispute specifics in the paper, which was authored by Arjen Lenstra, James Hughes, Maxime Augier, Joppe Bos, Thorsten Kleinjung and Christophe Wachter. The paper sought to look at the security tied to millions of public X.509 certificates that they collected across the web. Based on the data they collected, they concluded “1,024-bit RSA provides 99.8% security at best.”

The research group of cryptographers said they collected 6.4 million distinct X.509 certificates and PGP keys containing RSA moduli, and in analysing their enormous cache, found duplicate RSA-moduli keys about 1% of the time.

“More seriously, we stumbled upon 12,720 different 1,024-bit RSA moduli that offer no security,” the researchers said in their paper, which is titled “Ron was wrong, Whit was right” a reference to Ron Rivest, co-inventor of the RSA algorithm, and noted cryptographer Whitfield Diffie. The paper leveled a devastating critique against RSA as fundamentally flawed.

In its retort against the researchers’ paper, RSA said, “We welcome this form of research” because it “contributes to better overall security for everyone,” but emphasised “the RSA algorithm has withstood such scrutiny for decades from multiple sources.”

RSA went on to say good cryptography “depends on proper implementation. True random number generation underpins nearly all cryptographic algorithms and protocols, and must be performed with care against the weakening of well-designed cryptography. Our analysis points to the need for better care in implementation, generally tied to embedded devices. We see no fundamental flaw in the algorithm itself, and urge all cryptography users to ensure good implementation and best practices are followed.”

RSA also received some measure of support from noted security researcher Dan Kaminsky who posted a blog about the crypto controversy.

Lenstra and Hughes are prominent cryptographers, and Kaminsky says he considered they had done “excellent survey work” which in total included a look at 11.7 million public keys. But he basically rejected the fundamental thesis of their paper.

“[T]here’s just no way we get from this survey work, to the thesis that surrounds it,” writes Kaminsky in his blog. He argues that “On the basic level, risk in cryptography is utterly dominated, not by cipher selection, but by key management. The study found 12,720 public keys. It also found approximately 2.94 million expired certificates. And while the study didn’t discuss the number of certificates that had no reason to be trusted in the first place (being self signed) it did find 5.4 million PGP keys.”

Kaminsky goes on to say much more, including, “What the data from the survey says, unambiguously, is that most keys on the Internet today have no provenance that can be trusted, not even through whatever value the CA [certificate authority] system affords. Key Management — as Whit Diffie himself has said — is the hard problem now for cryptography.”

Kaminsky also observes, “This is a paper based on survey work, in which empirically validated existence of an implementation flaw (12,720 crackable keys) is being used to justify a design bias (don’t use a multi-secret algorithm). The argument is that multi-secret algorithms cause crackable public keys.”

Kaminsky indicated he doesn’t buy the conclusions made in the crypto researchers’ paper. “I don’t mean to be too hard on this paper, which again, has some excellent data and analysis inside. I’ve been strongly advocating for the collection of data in security, as I think we operate more on assumption and rumour than we’d like to admit. The flip side is that we must take care not to fit our data to those assumptions.”

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1cb91882/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33383120Crsa0Edenies0Eflaws0Ein0Esecurity0Ealgorithm0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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RSA brushes off crypto research findings that RSA algorithm is flawed



RSA says researchers’ results don’t indicate a fundamental flaw in the RSA algorithm but more likely a problem with implementing it

After having its flagship RSA crypto system called flawed this week by prominent researchers in a paper they made available online, EMC’s RSA security division struck back by saying the paper’s results don’t indicate a fundamental flaw in the RSA algorithm but more likely a problem with implementing it.

“On Feb. 14th, a research paper was submitted for publication stating that an alleged flaw has been found in the RSA encryption algorithm,” RSA said Thursday in a statement. “Our analysis confirms to us that the data does not point to a flaw in the algorithm, but instead points to the importance of proper implementation, especially regarding the exploding number of embedded devices that are connected to the Internet today.”

[ Read more on why crypto experts call RSA certificates flawed. | Windows 7 is making huge inroads into business IT. But with it comes new security threats and security methods. InfoWorld’s expert contributors show you how to secure the new OS in the “Windows 7 Security Deep Dive” PDF guide. ]

Ari Juels, chief scientist for RSA, told Network World that “the study is useful” as it pertains to the “failures of crypto protocols during random-number generation.” But he faults its core idea that the RSA algorithm is somehow fundamentally flawed.

“I’d say all cryptography relies on good true random-number generation. And when that goes wrong, the protocol breaks,” Juels says. He faults the conclusions of the paper that there was something intrinsically wrong with the RSA algorithm. The paper might have found that the RSA algorithm “might be a little less robust than another one,” but “it’s obviously not a problem with the RSA algorithm, it’s the way the keys were generated.”

He said this is not an issue that goes unrecognized today in industry, and Intel is in fact building a fast random-number generator in its upcoming Ivy Bridge chip.

RSA was not apprised of the paper before it appeared online.

In its formal statement, RSA did not dispute specifics in the paper, which was authored by Arjen Lenstra, James Hughes, Maxime Augier, Joppe Bos, Thorsten Kleinjung and Christophe Wachter. The paper sought to look at the security tied to millions of public X.509 certificates that they collected across the web. Based on the data they collected, they concluded “1,024-bit RSA provides 99.8% security at best.”

BACKGROUND: Crypto experts analyze millions of X.509 certificates, call RSA crypto flawed

The research group of cryptographers said they collected 6.4 million distinct X.509 certificates and PGP keys containing RSA moduli, and in analyzing their enormous cache, found duplicate RSA-moduli keys about 1% of the time.

“More seriously, we stumbled upon 12,720 different 1,024-bit RSA moduli that offer no security,” the researchers said in their paper, which is titled “Ron was wrong, Whit was right” a reference to Ron Rivest, co-inventor of the RSA algorithm, and noted cryptographer Whitfield Diffie. The paper leveled a devastating critique against RSA as fundamentally flawed.

Article source: http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/rsa-brushes-crypto-research-findings-rsa-algorithm-flawed-186702?source=rss_security

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Researchers break W3C XML encryption algorithm, push for new standard

Researchers in Germany have demonstrated weaknesses in the W3C XML encryption standard used to secure websites and other Web applications.

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