blog trackingRealtime Web Statistics Finds Archives | Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant | Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant

Posts Tagged ‘Finds’

$21mn contract to protect Chinese hacking victims broke gov’t rules, IG memo finds

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

$21mn contract to protect Chinese hacking victims broke gov’t rules, IG memo finds

The Inspector General of the Office of Personnel Management found “significant deficiencies” in the process for hiring contractors to protect millions of federal employees whose personal information was accessed by hackers linked to China last year. “We determined that the [Office of Personnel Management] did not award the … contract in compliance with the [Federal Acquisition Regulation] and [Office of Personnel Management] policies and procedures, which led to [the agency] selecting the wrong contracting vehicle,” Patrick McFarland, OPM Inspector General, wrote to OPM Director Beth Cobert, according to the Washington Post. “While we are unable to determine whether the issues we uncovered are significant enough to have impacted the award of the contract…it is evident that significant deficiencies existed… over the contract award process. Source: https://www.rt.com/usa/322363-government-contract-opm-china-hack/

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post $21mn contract to protect Chinese hacking victims broke gov’t rules, IG memo finds appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Jury finds Apple infringed on a Univeristy of Wisconsin patent with the A7, A8 and A8X chipsets

A jury has ruled that Apple infringed on a patent owned by the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s licensing arm, and could be forced to pay as much as $862 million in damages. The patent covers a method used to make processors run more efficiently, and was found to be used by Apple on its A7, A8 and A8X chipsets.

The A7 is found inside the Apple iPhone 5s, while the A8 is employed by the Apple iPhone 6, Apple iPhone 6 Plus and Apple iPad mini 4. The Apple iPad Air 2 is powered by the A8X. Apple’s legal team tried to convince the jury that the patent in question was not valid. The tech titan …

View full post on PhoneArena

Study finds that Android lock patterns tend to be too simple, just like passwords

A study conduced by a woman named Marte Løge, a graduate of Norwegian University of Science and Technology, found that Android users choose to set similar lock patterns that might be too easy for others to figure out. The study looked at 4000 patterns created and discovered that 77% of the patterns started from one of the four corners. 44% of the patterns created began from the top left corner.

Obviously, the more nodes used in the creation of the pattern, the larger the number of possible combinations and the harder it is for someone to discover your lock screen pattern. The average number …

View full post on PhoneArena

Georgia Tech Finds 11 Deep Security Flaws in Chrome, Firefox

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

The security researchers developed a new cyber-security analysis method that discovered the holes buried deeper in the systems. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology College of Computing earlier this year found 11 previously undiscovered flaws in two of the most widely used Internet browsers—Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. Worry not, however: The flaws have long been fixed.The security researchers developed a new cyber-security analysis method that discovered the holes buried deep in the systems. They were rewarded for their work with the Internet Defense Prize, an award presented by Facebook, in partnership with USENIX, at the 24th USENIX Security Symposium that ended Aug. 14.Ph.D. students Byoungyoung Lee and Chengyu Song, along with Professors Taesoo Kim and Wenke Lee(pictured), received $100,000 from Facebook to continue their research to make the Internet safer.Their research paper, “Type Casting Verification: Stopping an Emerging Attack Vector,” explores vulnerabilities in C++ programs—such as in Chrome and Firefox—that result from “bad casting” or “type confusion.” Bad casting enables an attacker to corrupt the memory in a browser so that it follows a malicious logic instead of proper instructions. The researchers developed a new, proprietary detection tool called CAVER to catch them. CAVER is a run-time detection […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Georgia Tech Finds 11 Deep Security Flaws in Chrome, Firefox appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

European Commission reportedly finds no evidence of collusion between Apple and record labels

Apple Music has certainly cast a spotlight on Apple over antitrust concerns, but a new report claims that European regulators have looked into the tech giant’s deals with music labels and found no evidence of collusion. From Re/Code:

Investigators examined whether the labels conspired with one another or with Apple on Apple’s new streaming music service in a way that would hurt rivals. The probe failed to turn up any illegal activity, though the EU will continue to monitor the market, sources said.

Apart from the European Commission, Apple Music is also being scrutinized by concerned consumers and regulators in the U.S.. In late July, U.S. Senator Al Franken penned a letter to the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission urging the agencies to look into Apple’s licensing agreements. At the same time, consumer advocacy group, Consumer Watchdog, also called for an investigation by the agencies.

For its part, the FTC is said to already be leading an investigation to determine whether Apple’s 30% cut of subscription fees from apps on its App Store, particularly from music streaming services like Spotify, is anticompetitive.

Source: Re/Code

View full post on MobileNations

Risk Evaluation Report Finds Mobile Banking Leaves Some Banks More Vulnerable to Cyber Attacks

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

While mobile banking is no doubt convenient for customers – and banks – there’s a significant downside to the fact that more and more financial institutions are using the technology: an increased risk that your personal information will fall in the hands of a cyber criminal. A new report [PDF] from the U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency suggests that banks’ strategies to implement mobile technology often leaves their infrastructure open to cyber attacks, the Chicago Tribune reports. According to the OCC’s semiannual risk perspective report released on Tuesday, banks are increasingly embracing the use of technology such as cloud computing and mobile banking to stave off the competition. While the ease of mobile banking and other advances can not only save customers time but save banks money, the OCC found that these systems can “increase exposure to technological and operational risk.” “Banks and their employees, customers and third-party service providers continue to be vulnerable to cyberattacks that can compromise data or systems or allow criminals to illegally obtain personally identifiable information,” the report states. The report also found that many banks lacks sufficient response plans if they find themselves on the wrong side of a cyber attack. “There are […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Risk Evaluation Report Finds Mobile Banking Leaves Some Banks More Vulnerable to Cyber Attacks appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Hacker finds vulnerability in Facebook, can delete your photo albums

facebook_research-600x399

Source: National Cyber Security – Produced By Gregory Evans

Like it or not, Facebook has become almost ubiquitous in today’s world. Most people you know, both young and old, are on there. Worse, some folks keep memories of their lives stored on the service, including precious photos that, in some cases, may not be backed up in any way. It feels safe, after all, Facebook wouldn’t lose them, right? Not so fast. This is less about Facebook losing them, I’m sure it has backups, but more about a third-party taking them away. That sounds scary, but a security researcher has proven it’s possible. Laxman Muthiyah posted his findings along with details of how the exploit works. Essentially he utilized the Graph API to accomplish both deletion of his own album and then that of a “victim”. Though Facebook claims this isn’t possible, it is quite the opposite case and proof is posted for everyone to see. The token generated should only grant limited access, however generating a token for the mobile version of the social network changed things. “The album got deleted! So i got the key to delete all of your Facebook photos”, Muthiya calmly states. Of course he won’t do this, he’s only proving a point. But that point should be acted upon quickly by […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Hacker finds vulnerability in Facebook, can delete your photo albums appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Apple Hacker Finds Undocumented iOS Backdoors

A well-known iPhone hacker and app developer has found a range of undocumented functions in Apple’s iOS mobile operating system that make it possible to grab data off devices wirelessly or via USB connections, without entering passwords or personal identification […]

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

View full post on National Cyber Security

Illegal immigration costs California taxpayers more than $25 billion a year, finds FAIR

Top Priority Sector:  border_security A new study released by the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) finds that providing education, health care, law enforcement, and social and government services to illegal aliens and their dependents costs Californians $25. Read More….

For more information go to http://www.NationalCyberSecurity.com, http://www. GregoryDEvans.com, http://www.LocatePC.net or http://AmIHackerProof.com

The post Illegal immigration costs California taxpayers more than $25 billion a year, finds FAIR appeared first on National Cyber Security.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Research Finds MAC Address Hashing Not a Fix for Privacy Problems

research project done by a graduate student at Stanford on the security of hashed MAC addresses in retail analytics software has shown that to be true once again.
One of the things that has raised the hackles of privacy advocates in recent years is the rise of passive tracking of consumers’ mobile devices as they move through stores, coffee shops, malls and other locations. Retailers can use software that detects the network announcements that cell phones with WiFi and Bluetooth enabled make periodically in order to track a given person’s device. This allows retail analytics firms to build databases that include the various locations that a device has been tracked in over a period of time.
This presents some rather obvious privacy issues, because most consumers have no idea that their devices are sending out these signals, let alone that retailers are gathering the information and building massive databases with the results. In October, a code of conduct surrounding retail analytics was released, and one of the provisions is for firms to hash the MAC addresses of users’ devices after they’re collected as a way to preserve users’ privacy. Jonathan Mayer, a PhD student at Stanford University, decided to take a look at how difficult it would be to reverse the hash of a given device’s MAC address, something that is meant to be quite difficult.
Hash functions take an input, in this case a device’s MAC address, and produce a random series of letters and numbers as the output, the hash value.

View full post on Who Got Hacked – Latest Hacking News and Security Updates

Page 1 of 712345»...Last »

My Twitter

  • Why It’s Awesome Being Single on Valentine’s Day https://t.co/rUsRVIN55P #dating @gregorydevans
    about 2 hours ago
  • Cyber Security News Today is out! https://t.co/xEaxm4V4N5 @gregorydevans #hacker
    about 3 hours ago
  • 81-Year-Old eHarmony Founder On Gay Marriage And Tinder https://t.co/R3YGKf81XT #dating @gregorydevans
    about 10 hours ago
  • It’s Valentine’s Day, My Dear Valentine! https://t.co/Jm9UiaWfYA #dating @gregorydevans
    about 14 hours ago
  • RT @LatestAnonNews: Latest Anonymous News is out! https://t.co/VS7Sbe8pWj Articles via --- @Legionof7 @BlakeDontCrack @GregoryDEvans
    about 14 hours ago

AmIHackerProof.com By Gregory D. Evans

Hacker For Hire By Gregory Evans

Gregory D. Evans On Facebook

Parent Securty By Gregory D. Evans

National Cyber Security By Gregory D. Evans

Dating Scams By Gregory Evans