blog trackingRealtime Web Statistics LEAD Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant

Posts Tagged ‘LEAD’

FBI sting may lead to killer of Pa. Guard members

By Tom Infield The Philadelphia Inquirer

On Aug. 9, 2005, four Pennsylvania National Guard soldiers from the Philadelphia region were killed when an improvised bomb exploded on a dirt road near Beiji, Iraq.

Now, thanks to an FBI sting operation and the discovery of latent fingerprints on a six-year-old unexploded bomb, veterans of the stricken Guard unit hope that the Justice Department might have a lead on who set the blast.

An Iraqi citizen, arrested in Kentucky last year after entering the United States as a refugee, is on tape telling an informant that he planted bombs of the same type, in the same area, and in the same time period as the deadly strike against Alpha Company of the 1-111th Infantry.

No connection to the Alpha attack has been reported by the government, and Justice officials say they cannot comment. But investigators told Alpha veterans recently that they were looking into it; and the troops are thrilled at even a chance of closure.

The Iraqi citizen, Waad Ramadan Alwan, 31, is in federal custody after pleading guilty in December to rigging bombs against American troops in Iraq and also trying to ship weapons from the United States back to Iraq.

Federal agents handling the investigation apparently were unaware of any possible Alpha link until a couple of Alpha soldiers read about Alwan's guilty plea on the Internet and called the FBI's attention to the attack on their unit.

"I think there is an extremely high chance that this guy was part of a [terrorist] cell that was waging war against us when we were there," said Staff Sgt. Joshua Hedetniemi, a Guard recruiter who was one of the men to call investigators.

Hedetniemi said he and "some of the boys" will fly to Bowling Green, Ky., when Alwan is sentenced in October.

Retired Sgt. First Class Trenton Williams, once platoon sergeant for two of the men killed, said he still lives with the shock of what happened.

"When you're over there, you can't put a face on your enemy. It's so ambiguous; you don't know who is who," said Williams, who works at the Veterans Administration. "You would feel a lot better about it if you actually got the guys who did it."

Alpha Company, based in Northeast Philadelphia, lost a total of six soldiers while serving in Iraq in 2004 and 2005. The deaths occurred in a four-day period at the height of the insurgency.

On Aug. 9, 2005, Alpha was the quick-reaction force for Task Force Dragoon, an 800-man battalion at Forward Operating Base Summerall 110 miles north of Baghdad.

Sixteen soldiers and two civilian dog handlers were sent out to investigate reports of insurgents firing grenades at truck convoys on the main supply route.

The men, in four armored humvees, rolled into an ambush. The four killed were all in the same humvee, ripped apart by the explosion of three 155mm shells wired together and ignited by a cellphone signal.

They were Pfc. Nathaniel DeTample, 19, of Morrisville, a student at Shippensburg University; Spec. Gennaro Pellegrini, 31, a Philadelphia police officer; Spec. Francis J. Straub Jr., 24, of Philadelphia, an employee of United Parcel Service; and Spec. John Kulick, 35, of Harleysville, a full-time firefighter in Whitpain and the father of a 9-year-old girl.

Two other Alpha soldiers, Spec. Kurt E. Krout, 43, of Spinnerstown, and Sgt. Brahim J. Jeffcoat, 25, of Philadelphia, had been killed three days earlier in a blast near Samarra. That attack was 60 miles from Beiji, outside of Task Force Dragoon's area of operations.

Kimberly DeTample, Nathaniel's mother, said even hearing word of the Alwan investigation caused her emotional pain. But she said she'd be glad for any resolution to the mystery of her son's death.

"I just assumed they would never figure out who did it. It's just one of those things in a war that happens," she said.

Alwan's name – and that of an alleged coconspirator, Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, 25 – surfaced publicly when the Justice Department announced their arrest last May. Hammadi awaits trial.

Calling it a breakthrough against terrorism, the government revealed that agents had been recording Alwan and Hammadi for months as they plotted with an FBI informant to ship cash and weapons – including Stinger missiles, C4 explosives, and grenade launchers – to extremists in Iraq.

The scheme was an FBI setup. The government said no weapons or cash went abroad.

In the course of the investigation, Alwan was heard telling the informant that he had worked at the power plant in Beiji – Alpha's patrol area – and belonged to an insurgent group that planted bombs almost daily.

"Alwan later explained that he was very good with a sniper rifle and that his 'lunch and dinner' would be an American," FBI Special Agent Richard Glenn said in a court affidavit.

(Retired Capt. Anthony Callum, commander of Alpha Company, said he remembers only one member of Task Force Dragoon being killed by a sniper.)

The Department of Homeland Security has not explained how Alwan or Hammadi got into the United States as refugees in 2009.

Officials said in December that, since the inception of an Iraqi refugee program in 2007, more than 62,000 Iraqis had been admitted. Many were translators who had worked with American forces.

The Justice Department has reported no other discovered extremists among the admitted refugees, but Homeland Security promised Congress it would do a tighter job of screening.

Daniel Cosgrove, a Homeland Security spokesman, said he was barred by law from discussing the status of any particular refugee, and could make no comment on Alwan or Hammadi.

Court-appointed lawyers for the pair did not return calls seeking comment.

Alwan's statements to the informant about his insurgent activities in Iraq were backed up when the FBI found physical evidence of that.

Records show that after his arrest, the FBI matched his fingerprints to an unexploded bomb made of artillery shells that was found with wires sticking up from the ground near the Alpha Company base on Sept. 1, 2005, three weeks after the fatal Alpha attack.

The defused explosive had sat with thousands of other bombs and bomb parts at an FBI lab in Quantico, Va. After Alwan came under investigation, officials ordered all of the pieces to be dusted for fingerprints.

Two of Alwan's showed up on a cordless telephone rigged as a triggering device.

Hammadi, whom Alwan recruited into the United States-to-Iraq exporting scheme, also allegedly told the FBI informant that he had a history as an Iraq insurgent.

Alwan, at one point, described Hammadi as a younger relative from al-Siniyah.

Al-Siniyah – or as-Siniyah, as it was known to U.S. troops – was the exact location of Forward Operating Base Summerall.

Edward Greene, an Alpha veteran, said he felt as if he'd been hit by a train when he learned of the close proximity – in time, place, and bomb method – between the attack on his unit and the activities Alwan already had admitted.

The former Army specialist, a truck driver in South Jersey, said, "I was amazed."

Copyright 2012 Philadelphia Newspapers, LLC

View full post on PoliceOne Daily News

View full post on National Cyber Security

Bad breakup? Police warn posting photos of ex-lovers online for revenge can lead to jail

Police are going after vengeful ex-lovers who post nude photos and videos of their former love interests after a breakup, a trend that authorities expect will escalate with social media’s increasing popularity.

“You can’t unring a bell. That image is going to be out there forever,” said Brian Sinclair, the assistant Bergen County prosecutor who is chief of the computer crimes unit. “People … have to understand before they click ‘send’: By transmitting images of their former partner, they’re likely committing a crime.”

Before the Internet was so prevalent, spurned exes could send revealing photos by mail. However, hitting the “send” button not only makes it much easier for a raging ex to distribute a nude photo, it also has lifelong implications for the victim if the image is copied by others and proliferates elsewhere on the Internet.

The crime of transmitting images or videos without someone’s consent falls under the state’s invasion of privacy statute created in 2004, and violators can face between three and five years in prison, authorities said. The Passaic County Internet Crimes Task Force has handled 38 cases since the unit was created in 2003, Sheriff Richard Berdnik said. Bergen County has investigated about 12 cases in the past three years.

The statute prohibits the posting of an image of a person engaged in sexual contact or a photo of a person’s private parts without their permission. Consent to a nude image being taken does not imply consent to its distribution, experts say. The sharing of the photo or video with just one person is as much of a crime as posting it to the World Wide Web.

“It’s becoming more and more pronounced as technology increases,” said Detective Capt. Robert Weston, who oversees the Passaic County task force. “I think as more and more people utilize social networking sites to communicate with one another and display photographs of themselves, individuals have subsequently used those sites to engage in illegal behavior.”

It is unclear how many states have invasion of privacy statutes that pertain to posting explicit images online. However, many statutes on the books elsewhere could cover such a crime, including lewdness, disseminating obscene materials and indecent exposure, said Eugene O’Donnell, professor of law and police studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Invasion of privacy cases are likely to become a growing area of concern as the reach of technology expands, O’Donnell said. He believes that both the number of people posting private photos without the subject’s consent and the number of victims willing to report it will increase dramatically.

Women are primarily the victims, but many do not turn to police because they are embarrassed. When victims do seek help, they are mostly interested in getting the images taken down, and the spiteful ex-lovers are often surprised to find that it’s a crime.

Police urge victims to call as soon as they find an image.

Article source: http://www.northjersey.com/news/Ex-lovers_can_be_charged_for_posting_explicit_photos.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Police warn posting photos of ex-lovers online can lead to jail

Police are going after vengeful ex-lovers who post nude photos and videos of their former love interests after a breakup, a trend that authorities expect will escalate with social media’s increasing popularity.

“You can’t unring a bell. That image is going to be out there forever,” said Brian Sinclair, the assistant Bergen County prosecutor who is chief of the computer crimes unit. “People … have to understand before they click ‘send’: By transmitting images of their former partner, they’re likely committing a crime.”

Before the Internet was so prevalent, spurned exes could send revealing photos by mail. However, hitting the “send” button not only makes it much easier for a raging ex to distribute a nude photo, it also has lifelong implications for the victim if the image is copied by others and proliferates elsewhere on the Internet.

The crime of transmitting images or videos without someone’s consent falls under the state’s invasion of privacy statute created in 2004, and violators can face between three and five years in prison, authorities said. The Passaic County Internet Crimes Task Force has handled 38 cases since the unit was created in 2003, Sheriff Richard Berdnik said. Bergen County has investigated about 12 cases in the past three years.

The statute prohibits the posting of an image of a person engaged in sexual contact or a photo of a person’s private parts without their permission. Consent to a nude image being taken does not imply consent to its distribution, experts say. The sharing of the photo or video with just one person is as much of a crime as posting it to the World Wide Web.

“It’s becoming more and more pronounced as technology increases,” said Detective Capt. Robert Weston, who oversees the Passaic County task force. “I think as more and more people utilize social networking sites to communicate with one another and display photographs of themselves, individuals have subsequently used those sites to engage in illegal behavior.”

It is unclear how many states have invasion of privacy statutes that pertain to posting explicit images online. However, many statutes on the books elsewhere could cover such a crime, including lewdness, disseminating obscene materials and indecent exposure, said Eugene O’Donnell, professor of law and police studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Invasion of privacy cases are likely to become a growing area of concern as the reach of technology expands, O’Donnell said. He believes that both the number of people posting private photos without the subject’s consent and the number of victims willing to report it will increase dramatically.

Women are primarily the victims, but many do not turn to police because they are embarrassed. When victims do seek help, they are mostly interested in getting the images taken down, and the spiteful ex-lovers are often surprised to find that it’s a crime.

Police urge victims to call as soon as they find an image.

Article source: http://www.northjersey.com/news/Ex-lovers_can_be_charged_for_posting_explicit_photos.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Lead Developer/Programmer / Confidential / San Francisco, CA

Confidential/San Francisco, CA (Soma)

We are a new startup, with ample funding and a legendary new product that needs help being built. You will be responsible for being on the founding team that codes thousands of lines of code to get the platform up and running through beta into a scalable viral must-have product in the web 2.0 industry. You will be a founding member, so you will have the opportunity for real equity, and a chance to be proud of a product that you created.

Candidate must be familiar with systems architecture, backend, frontend, and being a hacking/coding fiend to create a clean, useable, working product that you are proud of.
Salary is competitive and based on experience or if you can show up our pretty epic chief product architect in coding. Please submit your resume in the first email in either pdf or word format and outline why you are the best person for the job.

Please note, we are aware of the various backgrounds of an amazing programmer/systems architect, so don't feel dissuaded by the posted career level. If you've been coding as long as you can remember, know you're the best of the best, and can prove it, we want you. Our offices are centrally located in San Francisco, near South Beach.

REQUIREMENTS

Front end

Been playing with HTML/JS/CSS since high school or before

Fluent at Javascript

Thinks they can write apps that rival native in a modern browser

An eye for detail, no trouble quickly matching a photoshop mock pixel for pixel in HTML/CSS

Written or contributed to several sophisticated web apps with a server component

Understands the challenges facing modern web apps

A BS level understanding of computer science.

Strong knowledge of a backend language: Java, PHP, Python, etc…

An internship from a legit tech company…Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Amazon, etc…

Backend

A beast at PHP (or good enough to talk me out of using PHP), Java, and C++

Knows MySQL and understands databases in theory

Understands the backends of modern web apps

A BS in Comp Sci

Job experience from a legit tech company…Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Amazon, etc…

Experience with machine learning algorithms

Ready to build a website from scratch

Apply To Job

View full post on Wired Jobs

View full post on National Cyber Security

SI teen suicide may lead to cyber bullying law

Bronx Senator Jeff Klein is introducing a bill that would revise the state’s harassment laws to cover electronic bullying.

View full post on cyber stalking – Yahoo! News Search Results

View full post on National Cyber Security

WiFi, DDoS Vulnerabilities, Cyber-Attacks Lead Week’s Security News

Software security flaws dominated news headlines this week, as security experts discussed the implications of a vulnerability that was found in several Web application frameworks.

View full post on germany cyber attack – Yahoo! News Search Results

View full post on National Cyber Security

Cellphone-related fatal wrecks lead families to push for change

Take a look around the next time you’re at a stoplight. Chances are, you’ll see someone on a cellphone. These families are trying to convince drivers to put their phones away. The deaths of loved ones have turned them into advocates.

View full post on cellphone security – Yahoo! News Search Results

View full post on National Cyber Security

Principal Software Development Engineer, Lead

Location: Redmond, WA, US
Job ID: 747704-36268
Division: Corporate Research Development

The Technical Strategy and Incubation team is seeking a high achieving Principal Software Development Engineer Lead to lead the team in building a next generation UI/Graphics platform. This incubation team is chartered with pursuing strategic opportunities which are difficult to address incrementally with existing systems, such as UI responsiveness and security, rich applications that span devices, new web-centric programming models, and effective use of GPUs and many core.

The successful candidate is a Principal Software Development Engineer who is passionate about building next-generation technologies, enjoys startup environments, and loves to code. The candidate should have 5+ years’ management experience and 10+ years’ software engineering experience, ideally with experience in areas such as operating system or browser development.

Our team is a small hand-picked team of developers passionate about building real systems that extend the current thinking in Operating Systems and Platform technology. The Technical Strategy and Incubation team has the unique aspect of being outside of existing product groups, allowing us to pursue experimental ideas and solutions that may be impractical for existing products due to legacy demands and business commitments. This is a high visibility position with impact in the incubation, in the company, and in the overall market.

Because this is an incubation group, a candidate must have a high tolerance for uncertainty and changes in direction. Comfort with low-level systems development and expert proficiency in a C-like language are required. Additional desirable, but not mandatory, skills include familiarity with GPU programming and rendering techniques, numerical algorithms and geometry, asynchronous programming models, data parallelism, concurrency, data synchronization, data-driven UI frameworks, and real-time collaboration.

CR:CorpRD

TO APPLY

Click here to apply
-
Please mention that you saw the job on Wired

Article source: http://jobs.wired.com/job/principal-software-development-engineer-lead-redmond-wa-microsoft-a942e8a4b4/?d=1&source=rss_page

View full post on National Cyber Security

SAP SECURITY LEAD VIRSA GRC SOD SOX FIREFIGHTER

SAP SECURITY LEAD  VIRSA  GRC  SOD  SOX  FIREFIGHTER 

Major firm in Montvale, New Jersey is seeking a SAP Security Lead for a long term contract to hire opportunity. The ideal candidate will be responsible for planning and executing security tasks related to maintenance of SAP systems that the firm manages for various divisions that include ECC, Business Warehouse (BW), Supply Chain Planning (SCM), Enhanced Warehouse Management (EWM), eCommerce and Solution Manager. The selected candidate will be lead the Security team that includes on-site and off-shore personnel and support both Production Environments and Project Initiatives.

The candidate may be required to work flexible hours, including weekends and holidays to perform tasks off-hours if required, and willing to participate in 24/7 duty coverage.

Specific responsibilities will include:

Create, maintain and enforce Security standards and procedures

Supervise work of and provide guidance to on- and off-shore SAP Security Analysts

Administer SAP GRC tools (formerly known as Virsa)

Perform SOD analysis on user ID’s and roles

Maintain Risks, Rules and Mitigating Controls

Interact with off-shore and near shore support teams: Basis, development, application production support, business liaison.

Organize and manage security tasks for on-going projects

Debug security authorization issues

Provide regular status reports to various levels of management

Required Skills for this position will include:

Minimum 5-7 years of experience administering SAP Security various modules, including JAVA

Knowledge of SAP GRC tools

Has participated in a minimum three full life cycle SAP implementations

Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Experience in estimating and managing projects

Experience in production support

Preferred Skills/Qualifications:

Knowledge of Sarbanes-Oxley best practices

Working knowledge of SharePoint, experience in creating complex presentations and advanced spreadsheets

Bill.Stevens@PRITechnology.com

www.PriTechnology.com

Article source: http://jobview.monster.com/SAP-SECURITY-LEAD-VIRSA-GRC-SOD-SOX-FIREFIGHTER-Job-Montvale-NJ-US-103811533.aspx

View full post on National Cyber Security

Mac Malware, DoS Tools, Cyber-War Lead Week’s Security News

Mac malware dominated the news this week, as security researchers uncovered a new Trojan capable of hijacking Mac OS X systems and launching denial-of-service attacks on another server, downloading additional malware on the infected system and providing attackers with remote access on to the computer.
The Tsunami Trojan was a version of an older backdoor Trojan for the Linux operating system. While Windows Trojans have been re-packaged for the Mac before, Tsunami is likely the first to come over from the Linux world. The malware has already been mutating, with hackers adding new capabilities. There are versions attacking both 64-bit and 32-bit Intel x86 and PowerPC Mac computers.

A new denial of service attack tool targeting SSL servers was released this week. The THC-SSL-DOS tool exploits known issues with how SSL connections work to make it possible to launch denial-of-service attacks against a server over a plain residential DSL connection and a laptop.

As a general rule, for a denial of service attack to be effective, attackers either needed a lot of bandwidth, typically more than would be available on a DSL line, or a lot of computers to make up for the narrow network pipe. Since the THS-SSL-DOS tool attempts to establish a large number of SSL connections with the target server, it winds up eventually consuming all the system resources and making it unavailable, according to the developers, a German hacking outfit called The Hackers Choice (THC).

Brian Krebs, a security writer and principal analyst for Krebs on Security, said the type of malware used to attack RSA Security earlier in the year may have also hit more than 700 other organizations. These organizations weren’t attacked with technology stolen from RSA Security, but rather faced malware attacks using similar command-and-control infrastructure used by the malicious Excel spreadsheet that penetrated RSA’s systems.

Affected organizations included technology and non-technology companies. Even though internet service providers were included in the list posted on Krebs on Security, it was more likely that one of the subscribers had been hit and not the provider’s networks, according to Krebs.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has acknowledged there was a possibility that when cyber-attackers had infected more than 80 computers and servers, breached its networks, and copied data from one server to another, that some of that data may have left the company. Japan’s largest defense contractor remained mum about what may have been leaked.

The Japanese government had other cyber-worries to deal with, as reports emerged of systems belonging to members of Parliament and dozens of Japanese embassies abroad being infected with unknown malware over the summer.
Security experts warn that cyber-attackers can target United States critical infrastructure and cause a lot of damage. Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano said attackers were already attacking critical financial systems, transportation and other sensitive areas at an event in Washington, D.C. this week. It was important that Congressional lawmakers pass cyber-security legislation, she said.

Napolitano’s speech came a few days after BusinessWeek revealed the contents of a draft report by a Congressional commission which claimed that malicious perpetrators had interfered with two United States satellites four times over the past few years. While the U.S. China Economic and Security Review Commission report fell just short of directly accusing the Chinese government for backing the attackers, the commission said the tactics were consistent with strategies outlined in published Chinese military writings.


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Security/Mac-Malware-DoS-Tools-CyberWar-Lead-Weeks-Security-News-260078/

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Page 3 of 4«1234»

Get The New Book By Gregory Evans

Everyone Is Talking About!

Are You Hacker Proof?
$15.95

Find Out More, Click Here!