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Hacker took over deceased man’s Facebook

BROCKTON (FOX 25 / MyFoxBoston.com) – A Brockton family’s grief over the loss of their father was recently made worse when a hacker took over his dormant Facebook account.

Kaitlyn Marshalsea tells FOX 25 that her family realized someone had hacked into their deceased father Michael Marshalsea’s Facebook when they began seeing the account “liking” links.

“At first we made a joke about it, oh Dad is liking stuff on Facebook,” says Kaitlyn Marshalsea, “And we thought it was funny and then the whole thing changed.”

Pretty soon Michael’s entire profile changed. Kaitlyn says the hacker changed his occupation, interests and marital status.

Michael’s four children decided to leave the page up after his August 2010 death as a way for people to memorialize him. According to the Boston Herald , the Cambridge native used his Facebook account to stay in contact with his children and loved ones after moving to Florida just before his death.

Family members reported the activity to Facebook and were asked to provide a death certificate. After contacting the Boston Herald about their social media nightmare, they thought the site was taken down.

“If somebody was to sign back in, everything would pop back up,” says Kaitlyn.

Michael’s Facebook page is still viewable to those people he added as friends on his account.

The Marshalsea family hopes to save other families from going through a similar situation with one important reminder: what you post on the internet is in cyberspace forever.

“It’s the internet. We never thought it would happen to us. If they have his email address, what else can they get out of him?”

Article source: http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpp/news/local/familys-added-pain-over-the-hijacking-of-deceased-fathers-facebook-20120218

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers gained access to Nortel’s networks and took documents for more than a decade, even for years after the breach was discovered, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Former Nortel employee Brian Shields, who led the internal investigation of the hacking, told the WSJ that the company discovered the breach in 2004 but allowed the hacks to continue for years afterwards. Five years after the breach was discovered, in 2009, Shields found rootkits in laptops using an encrypted channel to send e-mail and other sensitive information to servers near Beijing.

Although the hackers were described by the WSJ and other publications as Chinese, Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos, cautioned against that assumption. Although the transmissions were traced to a Chinese IP address, that server could have been remotely hacked by someone in another country, he noted in a blog post.

The hackers stole seven passwords from top Nortel executives, including the CEO, using them to download technical papers, research and development reports, business plans, employee e-mails and other documents, Shields said. These passwords not only enabled the hackers to access the company’s network but also remotely control personal computers with spyware. The hackers “had access to everything,” he said.

The type of attacks Nortel experienced are commonly called APTs, or advanced persistent threats, which are on the rise. APTs are ideal for long-term hacks as they “are more stealthy, specifically designed to quietly, slowly spread to other hosts, gathering information over extended periods of time,” said the National Institute of Standards and Technology in its newly revised draft computer security guidelines, GCN reported.

It’s not known how the hackers obtained the passwords, but one common method is phishing, whereby the hackers trick users into giving up their personal log-in information.

“The human still is the weak link in everything,” said RSA’s Chief Information Security Officer Eddie Schwartz in a GCN article. Schwartz spoke on RSA’s security revamp efforts after its APT hack in March 2011.

Article source: http://gcn.com/articles/2012/02/15/hackers-roamed-nortel-networks-for-over-10-years.aspx

View full post on National Cyber Security » Spyware/ Cyber Snooping

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers gained access to Nortel’s networks and took documents for more than a decade, even for years after the breach was discovered, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Former Nortel employee Brian Shields, who led the internal investigation of the hacking, told the WSJ that the company discovered the breach in 2004 but allowed the hacks to continue for years afterwards. Five years after the breach was discovered, in 2009, Shields found rootkits in laptops using an encrypted channel to send e-mail and other sensitive information to servers near Beijing.

Although the hackers were described by the WSJ and other publications as Chinese, Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos, cautioned against that assumption. Although the transmissions were traced to a Chinese IP address, that server could have been remotely hacked by someone in another country, he noted in a blog post.

The hackers stole seven passwords from top Nortel executives, including the CEO, using them to download technical papers, research and development reports, business plans, employee e-mails and other documents, Shields said. These passwords not only enabled the hackers to access the company’s network but also remotely control personal computers with spyware. The hackers “had access to everything,” he said.

The type of attacks Nortel experienced are commonly called APTs, or advanced persistent threats, which are on the rise. APTs are ideal for long-term hacks as they “are more stealthy, specifically designed to quietly, slowly spread to other hosts, gathering information over extended periods of time,” said the National Institute of Standards and Technology in its newly revised draft computer security guidelines, GCN reported.

It’s not known how the hackers obtained the passwords, but one common method is phishing, whereby the hackers trick users into giving up their personal log-in information.

“The human still is the weak link in everything,” said RSA’s Chief Information Security Officer Eddie Schwartz in a GCN article. Schwartz spoke on RSA’s security revamp efforts after its APT hack in March 2011.

Article source: http://gcn.com/articles/2012/02/15/hackers-roamed-nortel-networks-for-over-10-years.aspx

View full post on National Cyber Security » Spyware/ Cyber Snooping

Former NM detective sues over firing

By Vic Vela Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE, N.M. — A former Santa Fe police detective – who was fired and ended up losing his law enforcement license after he was caught on an FBI tape allegedly making shady deals with a known felon – is suing for wrongful termination, claiming that he was the victim of entrapment.

Jose Valencia also accuses the police department administration of orchestrating the events that led to his termination in 2010 out of retaliation for uncovering "improper acts" at the department, according to a federal lawsuit that was filed in U.S. District Court on Friday.

City Manager Robert Romero – who is not named in the lawsuit – declined to comment on the lawsuit Monday, saying that the city has not yet been served with notice of the filing.

Valencia's firing came about two years after he was accused of agreeing to provide guns to a known drug dealer, Maximiliano Gonzales, with the knowledge that Gonzales intended to use the weapons to commit murder.

The conversations between Valencia – who was the president of the police union at the time – and Gonzales were captured on FBI recordings.

Valencia was also accused of providing descriptions of undercover drug officers to Gonzales, among other allegations.

Gonzales never followed through on any scheme to commit murder and Valencia has never been criminally charged. But the state Law Enforcement Academy Board ended up stripping Valencia of his law enforcement license for life in 2010, following an administrative hearing process.

Valencia claims in the 39-page federal lawsuit that he was done wrong by the city of Santa Fe and the police department.

Valencia alleges that findings of wrongdoing from an internal affairs investigation, stemming from his conversations with Gonzales, were retaliation for a series of unrelated events where he became a "thorn in the side" of the city.

Valencia maintains he uncovered wrongful acts by fellow officers and also refused to give in to the administration while he was negotiating contracts in his role as police union head, according to the lawsuit, filed by Albuquerque attorneys Alvin Garcia and Charles Lakins.

While under internal investigation for his dealings with Gonzales, Valencia claims, he uncovered overtime fraud by recruiting officers, including Gillian Alessio, who now is a deputy police chief. Valencia also reported that two police officers embezzled money from the Santa Fe Police Officer's Association.

In addition, Valencia says in the suit that he was retaliated against for refusing to "make an illegal arrest and falsify a police report in an incident that involved the juvenile nephew of (former police lieutenant) Gerald Rivera."

Valencia's suit accuses Assistant City Attorney Mark Allen and former high-ranking police officers of putting pressure on him while he conducted contract negotiations in his role as police union head, at the same time he was the subject of an internal affairs investigation.

Valencia claims that he was told he would receive leniency during the internal affairs process if he gave up on trying to get officers pay raises during the contract negotiations. Valencia's suit says he did not let up and that the day after contract negotiations concluded, he was served with the findings of the IA investigation, which sustained all allegations of misconduct against him, the lawsuit states.

As for the allegations of entrapment, Valencia's lawsuit claims that when Gonzales told Region III Multi-Jurisdictional Drug Task Force that he had information on Valencia being a "dirty cop," the unit "recruited" Gonzales "to engage in an entrapment operation designed and intended to induce (Valencia) into committing a crime – namely to sell a firearm to a known felon."

Several named and unnamed current and former officers are listed as defendants in the lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages.

Copyright 2012 Albuquerque Journal

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Former NM detective sues over firing

By Vic Vela Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE, N.M. — A former Santa Fe police detective – who was fired and ended up losing his law enforcement license after he was caught on an FBI tape allegedly making shady deals with a known felon – is suing for wrongful termination, claiming that he was the victim of entrapment.

Jose Valencia also accuses the police department administration of orchestrating the events that led to his termination in 2010 out of retaliation for uncovering "improper acts" at the department, according to a federal lawsuit that was filed in U.S. District Court on Friday.

City Manager Robert Romero – who is not named in the lawsuit – declined to comment on the lawsuit Monday, saying that the city has not yet been served with notice of the filing.

Valencia's firing came about two years after he was accused of agreeing to provide guns to a known drug dealer, Maximiliano Gonzales, with the knowledge that Gonzales intended to use the weapons to commit murder.

The conversations between Valencia – who was the president of the police union at the time – and Gonzales were captured on FBI recordings.

Valencia was also accused of providing descriptions of undercover drug officers to Gonzales, among other allegations.

Gonzales never followed through on any scheme to commit murder and Valencia has never been criminally charged. But the state Law Enforcement Academy Board ended up stripping Valencia of his law enforcement license for life in 2010, following an administrative hearing process.

Valencia claims in the 39-page federal lawsuit that he was done wrong by the city of Santa Fe and the police department.

Valencia alleges that findings of wrongdoing from an internal affairs investigation, stemming from his conversations with Gonzales, were retaliation for a series of unrelated events where he became a "thorn in the side" of the city.

Valencia maintains he uncovered wrongful acts by fellow officers and also refused to give in to the administration while he was negotiating contracts in his role as police union head, according to the lawsuit, filed by Albuquerque attorneys Alvin Garcia and Charles Lakins.

While under internal investigation for his dealings with Gonzales, Valencia claims, he uncovered overtime fraud by recruiting officers, including Gillian Alessio, who now is a deputy police chief. Valencia also reported that two police officers embezzled money from the Santa Fe Police Officer's Association.

In addition, Valencia says in the suit that he was retaliated against for refusing to "make an illegal arrest and falsify a police report in an incident that involved the juvenile nephew of (former police lieutenant) Gerald Rivera."

Valencia's suit accuses Assistant City Attorney Mark Allen and former high-ranking police officers of putting pressure on him while he conducted contract negotiations in his role as police union head, at the same time he was the subject of an internal affairs investigation.

Valencia claims that he was told he would receive leniency during the internal affairs process if he gave up on trying to get officers pay raises during the contract negotiations. Valencia's suit says he did not let up and that the day after contract negotiations concluded, he was served with the findings of the IA investigation, which sustained all allegations of misconduct against him, the lawsuit states.

As for the allegations of entrapment, Valencia's lawsuit claims that when Gonzales told Region III Multi-Jurisdictional Drug Task Force that he had information on Valencia being a "dirty cop," the unit "recruited" Gonzales "to engage in an entrapment operation designed and intended to induce (Valencia) into committing a crime – namely to sell a firearm to a known felon."

Several named and unnamed current and former officers are listed as defendants in the lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages.

Copyright 2012 Albuquerque Journal

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Google Wallet Hack Raises Concerns Over Mobile Payment Security

Following the disclosure of security vulnerabilities with Google Wallet on Android, Google disables prepaid cards and advises users to enable screen locks.

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Swagg Security claims Foxconn hack over poor working conditions

Hackers from Swagg Security claimed to have stolen internal data from Apple supplier Foxconn, and leaked the information online, in response to media reports of poor working conditions at the electronics manufacturer’s factories in China.

The hacker group announced the attack in a Twitter message yesterday, and also leaked data stolen from the Foxconn site to The Pirate Bay. It said the data included user names and passwords. “The passwords inside these files could allow individuals to make fraudulent orders under big companies like Microsoft, Apple, IBM, Intel, and Dell,” the hackers said in a message on Pastebin.

Foxconn declined to comment on the attack, stating that the company “does not comment on matters of internal network security.” Two service websites used by Foxconn’s customers to place orders were down this morning.

Swagg Security later updated their Twitter account to state: “Seems like Foxconn admins are angry, services.foxconn.com was taken down by them. Guess you guys made one to many orders”.

Foxconn, a major contract manufacturer of electronics including Apple’s iPhone, has faced negative publicity repeatedly since 2010 following a string of suicides at the company’s Chinese facilities. The spotlight was again on the company last month after The New York Times documented the unsafe working conditions and long hours employees have to endure at Foxconn’s factories.

An online petition from customers, demanding that Apple respond to recent criticisms of worker abuse in its supplier factories, and change working conditions at supplier factories in time for the launch of the next version of its iPhone, is scheduled to be delivered to the company today.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1c846b4a/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33362210Cswagg0Esecurity0Eclaim0Efoxconn0Ehack0Eover0Epoor0Eworking0Econditions0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Swagg Security claim Foxconn hack over poor working conditions

Hackers from Swagg Security claimed to have stolen internal data from Apple supplier Foxconn, and leaked the information online, in response to media reports of poor working conditions at the electronics manufacturer’s factories in China.

The hacker group announced the attack in a Twitter message yesterday, and also leaked data stolen from the Foxconn site to The Pirate Bay. It said the data included user names and passwords. “The passwords inside these files could allow individuals to make fraudulent orders under big companies like Microsoft, Apple, IBM, Intel, and Dell,” the hackers said in a message on Pastebin.

Foxconn declined to comment on the attack, stating that the company “does not comment on matters of internal network security.” Two service websites used by Foxconn’s customers to place orders were down this morning.

Swagg Security later updated their Twitter account to state: “Seems like Foxconn admins are angry, services.foxconn.com was taken down by them. Guess you guys made one to many orders”.

Foxconn, a major contract manufacturer of electronics including Apple’s iPhone, has faced negative publicity repeatedly since 2010 following a string of suicides at the company’s Chinese facilities. The spotlight was again on the company last month after The New York Times documented the unsafe working conditions and long hours employees have to endure at Foxconn’s factories.

An online petition from customers, demanding that Apple respond to recent criticisms of worker abuse in its supplier factories, and change working conditions at supplier factories in time for the launch of the next version of its iPhone, is scheduled to be delivered to the company today.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1c845219/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33362210Cswagg0Esecurity0Eclaim0Efoxconn0Ehack0Eover0Epoor0Eworking0Econditions0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Hacker ‘in terror’ over extradition

Computer hacker Gary McKinnon is “unable to control the terror that consumes his every waking moment” as he fights extradition to the US, his mother said.

Janis Sharp said the treatment of her son, who admits hacking into military computers but claims he was looking for evidence of UFOs, was “barbaric”.

She met supporters outside Number 10 to hand over poems of support for her son to mark the 10th anniversary of his first arrest. She urged Prime Minister David Cameron to raise the issue with US president Barack Obama when the two leaders meet at the White House next month.

Ms Sharp said: “Ten years have gone by and still Gary lives in a nightmare world – unable to control the terror that consumes his every waking moment. This endless pressure on an Aspergic man with severe mental health issues is barbaric. And for what? A foolish act that caused embarrassment to the US. Where has our sense of proportion gone?”

She told reporters on Downing Street: “He can’t deal with it. He sits in the dark – it’s ruined his life. His mental health has deteriorated and it’s ruined our lives.” And Ms Sharp said her son does not have an outlet because he cannot use a computer.

The High Court expressed concern over how long McKinnon’s case was taking to return to court last month, with two judges listing the case for July in a bid to speed matters up.

They acted after hearing that Home Secretary Theresa May is “considering afresh” whether Asperger’s sufferer McKinnon should be extradited to the US to face trial for hacking into military computers in 2002.

She said: “In March David Cameron is visiting President Obama to discuss our ‘special relationship’. What an opportunity for our PM to finally announce an end to Gary’s 10-year ordeal. This act alone would prove that the ‘special relationship’ has true meaning and is one of mutual respect.”

McKinnon’s legal team hopes Mrs May will block extradition amid predictions he could be jailed for 60 years in America. Medical evidence shows the 45-year-old was “suffering from a serious mental disorder and there is a serious risk of suicide if extradited”, his legal team has said.

McKinnon, from Wood Green, north London, admits hacking but claims he was looking for evidence of UFOs.

Article source: http://uk.news.yahoo.com/hacker-terror-over-extradition-152755851.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Hacker Group Anonymous Intercepted U.S. Call Over Investigation

The U.S. government said the online hacker group Anonymous intercepted a telephone call between FBI agents and U.K. authorities involving a joint investigation of the group.

View full post on federal hacker – Yahoo! News Search Results

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