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Case of accused con man delayed by questions over lawyer

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A Westchester judge will decide if accused con man Vickram Bedi needs to find a new lawyer because his old lawyer is suing his current one in civil court.

County prosecutors said today that they plan to file papers seeking to disqualify attorney Anthony Giordano from Bedi’s criminal case, in which he and his business, Datalink Computer Systems, are charged with first-degree grand larceny.

Bedi, a Chappaqua resident, is alleged to have swindled multimillionaire musician and oil heir Roger Davidson out of at least $20 million over a six-year span. Prosecutors say Bedi and his then-girlfriend ran a scam to make Davidson believe that a computer virus put him and his family in grave danger but that they could offer him protection. Bedi was arrested in November 2010, and his ex-girlfriend, Helga Ingvarsdottir, already pleaded guilty to grand larceny.

Giordano, who took over Bedi’s case a few months ago, has accused Davidson of being mentally ill and suggested he paid Bedi to tell him made-up stories as part of a role-playing game. He said Davidson set Bedi up after losing millions in a hedge-fund deal that involved Bedi.

In court today, prosecutors Steven Vandervelden and Nicole Gamble discussed court papers filed by Giordano’s law partner, Bruce Stern, citing a potential conflict with Bedi’s case. Bedi is suing his former civil lawyer, David Browde, for malpractice, which prompted Browde to countersue, accusing Bedi and Giordano of fraud, collusion, breach of contract and abuse of process.

Giordano said Bedi wants him to stay on at his attorney, but county Judge Barbara Zambelli gave prosecutors two weeks to make a formal application to remove Giordano from the case.

The legal wrinkle means prosecutors do not have to turn over evidence in the case to Giordano for now because his future as Bedi’s lawyer is unclear.

“This is just a delaying tactic,” Giordano said. “Meanwhile, my client sits in jail.”

Bedi, who has pleaded not guilty, is being held on $5 million bail. He faces a maximum punishment of 25 years in state prison if convicted.

Article source: http://www.lohud.com/article/20120228/NEWS02/302280077

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Greek teen arrested over ministry cyber attack

Greek police said Monday they had arrested an 18-year-old suspected of hacking into the justice ministry's website earlier this month, an attack claimed on behalf of online hackers group Anonymous.

View full post on cyber attack – Yahoo! News Search Results

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NORIS computer system shut down over virus

It is a computer system that helps police officers get criminals off the streets. Friday, that system is down for the third day, affecting about 200 different agencies, including police departments, jails and courts all over northwest Ohio.

View full post on computer worm – Yahoo! News Search Results

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Anonymous targets Vic Toews over Internet surveillance bill, revives Vikileaks

The hacker group Anonymous is promising that Vic Toews "will be exposed for the hypocrite" he is

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World abuzz over single-atom transistor which “may yield computer with unparalleled computational efficiency”

How far can nanotech go?

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney today officially announced the publication of a paper entitled A single-atom transistor. And there, it would seem, you have it. What more is there to say?World abuzz over single-atom transistor which “may yield computer with unparalleled computational efficiency”, Blog, computer, over, World, “May, Unparalleled, abuzz, singleatom, transistor, yield, computational, efficiency”

View full post on Naked Security – Sophos

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Vikileaks Twitter campaign falls over, but Vic Toews still standing

While the fury over Canadian Public Safety Minister Vic Toews’ really, really poor choice of words continues to snowball, Vikileaks Twitter campaign was shut down last night.Vikileaks Twitter campaign falls over, but Vic Toews still standing, Blog, Twitter, Campaign, over, Toews, still, falls, Vikileaks, standing

View full post on Naked Security – Sophos

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Hacker took over deceased man’s Facebook

BROCKTON (FOX 25 / MyFoxBoston.com) – A Brockton family’s grief over the loss of their father was recently made worse when a hacker took over his dormant Facebook account.

Kaitlyn Marshalsea tells FOX 25 that her family realized someone had hacked into their deceased father Michael Marshalsea’s Facebook when they began seeing the account “liking” links.

“At first we made a joke about it, oh Dad is liking stuff on Facebook,” says Kaitlyn Marshalsea, “And we thought it was funny and then the whole thing changed.”

Pretty soon Michael’s entire profile changed. Kaitlyn says the hacker changed his occupation, interests and marital status.

Michael’s four children decided to leave the page up after his August 2010 death as a way for people to memorialize him. According to the Boston Herald , the Cambridge native used his Facebook account to stay in contact with his children and loved ones after moving to Florida just before his death.

Family members reported the activity to Facebook and were asked to provide a death certificate. After contacting the Boston Herald about their social media nightmare, they thought the site was taken down.

“If somebody was to sign back in, everything would pop back up,” says Kaitlyn.

Michael’s Facebook page is still viewable to those people he added as friends on his account.

The Marshalsea family hopes to save other families from going through a similar situation with one important reminder: what you post on the internet is in cyberspace forever.

“It’s the internet. We never thought it would happen to us. If they have his email address, what else can they get out of him?”

Article source: http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpp/news/local/familys-added-pain-over-the-hijacking-of-deceased-fathers-facebook-20120218

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers gained access to Nortel’s networks and took documents for more than a decade, even for years after the breach was discovered, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Former Nortel employee Brian Shields, who led the internal investigation of the hacking, told the WSJ that the company discovered the breach in 2004 but allowed the hacks to continue for years afterwards. Five years after the breach was discovered, in 2009, Shields found rootkits in laptops using an encrypted channel to send e-mail and other sensitive information to servers near Beijing.

Although the hackers were described by the WSJ and other publications as Chinese, Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos, cautioned against that assumption. Although the transmissions were traced to a Chinese IP address, that server could have been remotely hacked by someone in another country, he noted in a blog post.

The hackers stole seven passwords from top Nortel executives, including the CEO, using them to download technical papers, research and development reports, business plans, employee e-mails and other documents, Shields said. These passwords not only enabled the hackers to access the company’s network but also remotely control personal computers with spyware. The hackers “had access to everything,” he said.

The type of attacks Nortel experienced are commonly called APTs, or advanced persistent threats, which are on the rise. APTs are ideal for long-term hacks as they “are more stealthy, specifically designed to quietly, slowly spread to other hosts, gathering information over extended periods of time,” said the National Institute of Standards and Technology in its newly revised draft computer security guidelines, GCN reported.

It’s not known how the hackers obtained the passwords, but one common method is phishing, whereby the hackers trick users into giving up their personal log-in information.

“The human still is the weak link in everything,” said RSA’s Chief Information Security Officer Eddie Schwartz in a GCN article. Schwartz spoke on RSA’s security revamp efforts after its APT hack in March 2011.

Article source: http://gcn.com/articles/2012/02/15/hackers-roamed-nortel-networks-for-over-10-years.aspx

View full post on National Cyber Security » Spyware/ Cyber Snooping

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers roamed Nortel’s networks for over 10 years

Hackers gained access to Nortel’s networks and took documents for more than a decade, even for years after the breach was discovered, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Former Nortel employee Brian Shields, who led the internal investigation of the hacking, told the WSJ that the company discovered the breach in 2004 but allowed the hacks to continue for years afterwards. Five years after the breach was discovered, in 2009, Shields found rootkits in laptops using an encrypted channel to send e-mail and other sensitive information to servers near Beijing.

Although the hackers were described by the WSJ and other publications as Chinese, Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos, cautioned against that assumption. Although the transmissions were traced to a Chinese IP address, that server could have been remotely hacked by someone in another country, he noted in a blog post.

The hackers stole seven passwords from top Nortel executives, including the CEO, using them to download technical papers, research and development reports, business plans, employee e-mails and other documents, Shields said. These passwords not only enabled the hackers to access the company’s network but also remotely control personal computers with spyware. The hackers “had access to everything,” he said.

The type of attacks Nortel experienced are commonly called APTs, or advanced persistent threats, which are on the rise. APTs are ideal for long-term hacks as they “are more stealthy, specifically designed to quietly, slowly spread to other hosts, gathering information over extended periods of time,” said the National Institute of Standards and Technology in its newly revised draft computer security guidelines, GCN reported.

It’s not known how the hackers obtained the passwords, but one common method is phishing, whereby the hackers trick users into giving up their personal log-in information.

“The human still is the weak link in everything,” said RSA’s Chief Information Security Officer Eddie Schwartz in a GCN article. Schwartz spoke on RSA’s security revamp efforts after its APT hack in March 2011.

Article source: http://gcn.com/articles/2012/02/15/hackers-roamed-nortel-networks-for-over-10-years.aspx

View full post on National Cyber Security » Spyware/ Cyber Snooping

Former NM detective sues over firing

By Vic Vela Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE, N.M. — A former Santa Fe police detective – who was fired and ended up losing his law enforcement license after he was caught on an FBI tape allegedly making shady deals with a known felon – is suing for wrongful termination, claiming that he was the victim of entrapment.

Jose Valencia also accuses the police department administration of orchestrating the events that led to his termination in 2010 out of retaliation for uncovering "improper acts" at the department, according to a federal lawsuit that was filed in U.S. District Court on Friday.

City Manager Robert Romero – who is not named in the lawsuit – declined to comment on the lawsuit Monday, saying that the city has not yet been served with notice of the filing.

Valencia's firing came about two years after he was accused of agreeing to provide guns to a known drug dealer, Maximiliano Gonzales, with the knowledge that Gonzales intended to use the weapons to commit murder.

The conversations between Valencia – who was the president of the police union at the time – and Gonzales were captured on FBI recordings.

Valencia was also accused of providing descriptions of undercover drug officers to Gonzales, among other allegations.

Gonzales never followed through on any scheme to commit murder and Valencia has never been criminally charged. But the state Law Enforcement Academy Board ended up stripping Valencia of his law enforcement license for life in 2010, following an administrative hearing process.

Valencia claims in the 39-page federal lawsuit that he was done wrong by the city of Santa Fe and the police department.

Valencia alleges that findings of wrongdoing from an internal affairs investigation, stemming from his conversations with Gonzales, were retaliation for a series of unrelated events where he became a "thorn in the side" of the city.

Valencia maintains he uncovered wrongful acts by fellow officers and also refused to give in to the administration while he was negotiating contracts in his role as police union head, according to the lawsuit, filed by Albuquerque attorneys Alvin Garcia and Charles Lakins.

While under internal investigation for his dealings with Gonzales, Valencia claims, he uncovered overtime fraud by recruiting officers, including Gillian Alessio, who now is a deputy police chief. Valencia also reported that two police officers embezzled money from the Santa Fe Police Officer's Association.

In addition, Valencia says in the suit that he was retaliated against for refusing to "make an illegal arrest and falsify a police report in an incident that involved the juvenile nephew of (former police lieutenant) Gerald Rivera."

Valencia's suit accuses Assistant City Attorney Mark Allen and former high-ranking police officers of putting pressure on him while he conducted contract negotiations in his role as police union head, at the same time he was the subject of an internal affairs investigation.

Valencia claims that he was told he would receive leniency during the internal affairs process if he gave up on trying to get officers pay raises during the contract negotiations. Valencia's suit says he did not let up and that the day after contract negotiations concluded, he was served with the findings of the IA investigation, which sustained all allegations of misconduct against him, the lawsuit states.

As for the allegations of entrapment, Valencia's lawsuit claims that when Gonzales told Region III Multi-Jurisdictional Drug Task Force that he had information on Valencia being a "dirty cop," the unit "recruited" Gonzales "to engage in an entrapment operation designed and intended to induce (Valencia) into committing a crime – namely to sell a firearm to a known felon."

Several named and unnamed current and former officers are listed as defendants in the lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages.

Copyright 2012 Albuquerque Journal

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