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NBC producer fired over editing Zimmerman 911 call

By Frazier Moore AP Television Writer

NEW YORK — NBC News has fired a producer for editing a recording of George Zimmerman's call to police the night he shot Trayvon Martin, a person with direct knowledge of the matter said Saturday.

The person was not authorized to talk about the situation publicly and spoke on the condition of anonymity. The identity of the producer was not disclosed.

An NBC spokeswoman declined to comment.

The producer's dismissal followed an internal investigation that led to NBC apologizing for having aired the misleading audio.

NBC's "Today" show first aired the edited version of Zimmerman's call on March 27. The recording viewers heard was trimmed to suggest that Zimmerman volunteered to police, with no prompting, that Martin was black: "This guy looks like he's up to no good. He looks black."

But the portion of the tape that was deleted had the 911 dispatcher asking Zimmerman if the person who had raised his suspicion was "black, white or Hispanic," to which Zimmerman responded, "He looks black."

Later that night of Feb. 26, the 17-year-old Martin was fatally shot by Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. Though Martin was unarmed, Zimmerman told police he fired in self-defense after Martin attacked him.

Questions subsequently have arisen over whether Zimmerman was racially profiling the teen, a theory the edited version of the tape seemed to support.

On Tuesday, NBC said its investigation turned up "an error made in the production process that we deeply regret." It promised that "necessary steps" would be taken "to prevent this from happening in the future" and apologized to viewers.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press

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The debate over ‘police militarization’ continues

Author: Lance Eldridge

In January of this year, PoliceOne’s Chuck Remsberg published a controversial letter from Retired Constable Scott Enlow that created a bit of a blog firestorm.

Mr. Enlow expressed his concerns that with a combination of federally-purchased “military-type equipment,” an influx of war veterans into the profession, and police uniforms that have what he believed to be a military look, has militarized our nation’s local law enforcement profession. As a result, Enlow believes that law enforcers will eventually stand apart from the communities they serve. It’s unlikely, however, that the police will ever become truly “militarized” so long as police authority comes from the rule of law and our enduring though often-times eroded constitutional principles. Police in this country do not, after all, operate under a regime that allows for flexible and ever-changing rules of engagement determined by local or national executive authority. The problem in discussing police “militarization” is that the word is vague enough that for some it conjures images of jack-booted thugs and, for others, its an understandable and justifiable answer to increasingly violent criminal behavior. This should be a clear-headed debate among professionals, but the responses to Mr. Enlow’s letter shows just how distended and emotional this issue has become. Some of the postings focused on the minutia of weapon and caliber selections for both handguns and patrol rifles. The selection of both is important but has little direct bearing on the topic of “militarization.” One would also be hard pressed to explain why the issue of a patrol rifle to an officer was any more military-like than, say, the purchase of one of the several models of Thompson machine guns during Prohibition. As one contemporary author picturesquely wrote: “While the Thompson gun is a simple one to handle, it should not be used indiscriminately by any member of a police department. Machine gunning is a job requiring expertise.” Others took issue with Mr. Enlow’s concern about uniforms that have a military appearance, one example being pants with cargo pockets. Many supporters of this look lauded the comfort and practicality. The current popular trend appears to be the reissue of darker uniforms (and a return to the traditional black-and-white patrol cars) that bring a tactical advantage, especially at night. However, this trend is not universal and local departments continue to make decisions based on community needs with the likely support of locally elected political authority. It’s also unlikely that the style or color of a uniform will deter the most violent or antisocial miscreants. With police homicides an increasingly common occurrence, it would be surprising to learn that the tragically murdered officers could somehow have avoided injury or death because of a uniform. Neither BDUs nor a more traditional light blue shirt will either discourage or encourage the most violent deviants from an unprovoked attack. Instead, the uniform may be more important to those we protect than those we pursue. As early as 1982, researcher Daniel J. Bell concluded the officer’s demeanor “exerts considerably more influence on the citizen’s attitude than does the uniform, officer’s attitude, or any additional factor acting independently.”1 More recently, Richard Johnson maintained that the darker the uniform the more likely it is that citizens will respond negatively to the officer, though Johnson’s conclusions apparently do not consider the importance of officer attitude. Both suggest that those wearing a darker, more military-style uniform may act more aggressively, matching their tone with their dress. However, their conclusions are not conclusive. The uniform implies trust and authority. Only an individual officer can earn respect or alienate those whom he or she contacts by exercising authority before common sense. Radley Balko of the libertarian Cato Institute has been especially critical of advances in police tactics and the growth of SWAT teams throughout the country. Though Balko believes that SWAT may serve a purpose in a large city, he’s not so sure that such an organization has a legitimate role in smaller jurisdictions. He also argues that the special teams are inappropriately used to conduct routine police work and often violate an individual’s civil liberties in the process, especially when SWAT teams mistakenly use force against the wrong citizen.2 Balko blames the growth of SWAT on the federal government’s so-called war on drugs and the money and surplus equipment Washington makes available to communities that would otherwise not have a need for such capabilities. After all, small community police departments were able to serve warrants and arrest offenders before SWAT. Those that are concerned that this trend in improved tactical capabilities and the acquisition of all things that go bang could change have little to fear. Recent press reports show that law enforcement requests for surplus military equipment has risen 400 percent since 2011 http://www.thedaily.com/page/2011/12/05/120511-news-militarized-police-1-6/. The amount of funding the federal government provides to local law enforcement agencies is also astronomical. One of the most insightful comments came from Bill DeWeese, a 14-year police veteran now teaching at Hocking College. He rightly noted that our military forces have become more police-like while performing peace keeping and stability operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He also noted a “bizarre cultural mix between mil & LE.” Bill wrote that “militarization implies a fundamental legal, operational and administrative change in policing that hasn’t happened.” The implied trend of which Mr. Enlow writes may be disconcerting to some, but probably little different than that experienced at the end of 20th Century wars and conflicts, when new members entered the law enforcement community with extensive military experience. The public has little to fear from LE professionals so long as our constitutional checks-and-balances remain effective and new officers understand and embrace the difference between their service as a soldier and that of a law enforcement professional.


1Daniel J. Bell, “Police Uniforms, Attitudes, and Citizens, Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol 10, pp. 45-55 2Also see Radley Balko, Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids in America, Cato Institute: 2006

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Good Reads: Weighing the tactics in battles over drones, hackers, and abortion rights

In America, US citizens fret about what they see as the decline of their nation and its influence in the world. The economy is ho-hum, confidence is shaken, and smaller nations like Iran, South Africa, and Venezuela are increasingly talking back. Here in Afghanistan, the Obama administration is planning to gradually draw down military forces as it did in Iraq a few years back.

Skip to next paragraph

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But the US hasn’t halted its use of military force against US enemies abroad. Instead, the US is making greater use of new tools, such as the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, commonly known as a drone. Once used primarily for surveillance, drones now carry smart bombs and other precision weapons, and they are increasingly used against certain individuals seen by the US as dangerous, often in places where the US is not technically at war.

While drones can be incredibly effective, on a mission-by-mission basis, killing suspected radicals such as Anwar Al-Awlaki in Yemen, for instance, they can also be equally controversial. Pakistan’s government, for instance, has come close to breaking its military cooperation because of the US use of drones inside Pakistani airspace. And in a persuasive opinion piece in Foreign Policy, David Rohde (who has won two Pulitzer Prizes, one as a former Christian Science Monitor correspondent in Bosnia), writes that excessive reliance on drones may actually backfire politically on the Obama administration.

For every suspected terrorist killed by a drone, there may be dozens of others who are drawn to open hostility toward the US, or in worst cases, to terrorist causes because of what they see as overbearing US power. Mr. Rohde is no tie-dye-wearing peacenik. Captured and held by the Taliban for seven months, he says he believes that “drone strikes should be carried out — but very selectively.”

“For me, the bottom line is that both governments’ approaches are failing. Pakistan’s economy is dismal. Its military continues to shelter Taliban fighters it sees as proxies to thwart Indian encroachment in Afghanistan. And the percentage of Pakistanis supporting the use of the Pakistani Army to fight extremists in the tribal areas — the key to eradicating militancy — dropped from a 53 percent majority in 2009 to 37 percent last year. Pakistan is more unstable today than it was when Obama took office.” 

RECOMMENDED: Expert QA: Who is Hafiz Saeed and why the $10 million bounty?

Al Qaeda militants, computer hackers generally don’t carry weapons. But in the eyes of the US government, they are no less dangerous. A US National Security Council assessment warned last year that computer hacker organizations had the potential to shut down America’s electrical power grids. Technically speaking, the Security Council is right. A well-designed computer virus can do a lot of damage. Ask the Iranians, whose nuclear power development system was nearly destroyed by a computer worm called Stuxnet.


Next

Article source: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Keep-Calm/2012/0406/Good-Reads-Weighing-the-tactics-in-battles-over-drones-hackers-and-abortion-rights

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Good Reads: Weighing the tactics in battles over drones, hackers, and abortion rights

In America, US citizens fret about what they see as the decline of their nation and its influence in the world. The economy is ho-hum, confidence is shaken, and smaller nations like Iran, South Africa, and Venezuela are increasingly talking back. Here in Afghanistan, the Obama administration is planning to gradually draw down military forces as it did in Iraq a few years back.

Skip to next paragraph

Recent posts

But the US hasn’t halted its use of military force against US enemies abroad. Instead, the US is making greater use of new tools, such as the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, commonly known as a drone. Once used primarily for surveillance, drones now carry smart bombs and other precision weapons, and they are increasingly used against certain individuals seen by the US as dangerous, often in places where the US is not technically at war.

While drones can be incredibly effective, on a mission-by-mission basis, killing suspected radicals such as Anwar Al-Awlaki in Yemen, for instance, they can also be equally controversial. Pakistan’s government, for instance, has come close to breaking its military cooperation because of the US use of drones inside Pakistani airspace. And in a persuasive opinion piece in Foreign Policy, David Rohde (who has won two Pulitzer Prizes, one as a former Christian Science Monitor correspondent in Bosnia), writes that excessive reliance on drones may actually backfire politically on the Obama administration.

For every suspected terrorist killed by a drone, there may be dozens of others who are drawn to open hostility toward the US, or in worst cases, to terrorist causes because of what they see as overbearing US power. Mr. Rohde is no tie-dye-wearing peacenik. Captured and held by the Taliban for seven months, he says he believes that “drone strikes should be carried out — but very selectively.”

“For me, the bottom line is that both governments’ approaches are failing. Pakistan’s economy is dismal. Its military continues to shelter Taliban fighters it sees as proxies to thwart Indian encroachment in Afghanistan. And the percentage of Pakistanis supporting the use of the Pakistani Army to fight extremists in the tribal areas — the key to eradicating militancy — dropped from a 53 percent majority in 2009 to 37 percent last year. Pakistan is more unstable today than it was when Obama took office.” 

RECOMMENDED: Expert QA: Who is Hafiz Saeed and why the $10 million bounty?

Al Qaeda militants, computer hackers generally don’t carry weapons. But in the eyes of the US government, they are no less dangerous. A US National Security Council assessment warned last year that computer hacker organizations had the potential to shut down America’s electrical power grids. Technically speaking, the Security Council is right. A well-designed computer virus can do a lot of damage. Ask the Iranians, whose nuclear power development system was nearly destroyed by a computer worm called Stuxnet.


Next

Article source: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Keep-Calm/2012/0406/Good-Reads-Weighing-the-tactics-in-battles-over-drones-hackers-and-abortion-rights

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Good Reads: Weighing the tactics in battles over drones, hackers, and abortion rights

In America, US citizens fret about what they see as the decline of their nation and its influence in the world. The economy is ho-hum, confidence is shaken, and smaller nations like Iran, South Africa, and Venezuela are increasingly talking back. Here in Afghanistan, the Obama administration is planning to gradually draw down military forces as it did in Iraq a few years back.

Skip to next paragraph

Recent posts

But the US hasn’t halted its use of military force against US enemies abroad. Instead, the US is making greater use of new tools, such as the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, commonly known as a drone. Once used primarily for surveillance, drones now carry smart bombs and other precision weapons, and they are increasingly used against certain individuals seen by the US as dangerous, often in places where the US is not technically at war.

While drones can be incredibly effective, on a mission-by-mission basis, killing suspected radicals such as Anwar Al-Awlaki in Yemen, for instance, they can also be equally controversial. Pakistan’s government, for instance, has come close to breaking its military cooperation because of the US use of drones inside Pakistani airspace. And in a persuasive opinion piece in Foreign Policy, David Rohde (who has won two Pulitzer Prizes, one as a former Christian Science Monitor correspondent in Bosnia), writes that excessive reliance on drones may actually backfire politically on the Obama administration.

For every suspected terrorist killed by a drone, there may be dozens of others who are drawn to open hostility toward the US, or in worst cases, to terrorist causes because of what they see as overbearing US power. Mr. Rohde is no tie-dye-wearing peacenik. Captured and held by the Taliban for seven months, he says he believes that “drone strikes should be carried out — but very selectively.”

“For me, the bottom line is that both governments’ approaches are failing. Pakistan’s economy is dismal. Its military continues to shelter Taliban fighters it sees as proxies to thwart Indian encroachment in Afghanistan. And the percentage of Pakistanis supporting the use of the Pakistani Army to fight extremists in the tribal areas — the key to eradicating militancy — dropped from a 53 percent majority in 2009 to 37 percent last year. Pakistan is more unstable today than it was when Obama took office.” 

RECOMMENDED: Expert QA: Who is Hafiz Saeed and why the $10 million bounty?

Al Qaeda militants, computer hackers generally don’t carry weapons. But in the eyes of the US government, they are no less dangerous. A US National Security Council assessment warned last year that computer hacker organizations had the potential to shut down America’s electrical power grids. Technically speaking, the Security Council is right. A well-designed computer virus can do a lot of damage. Ask the Iranians, whose nuclear power development system was nearly destroyed by a computer worm called Stuxnet.


Next

Article source: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Keep-Calm/2012/0406/Good-Reads-Weighing-the-tactics-in-battles-over-drones-hackers-and-abortion-rights

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Apple Mac Flashback botnet now numbers over 600,000

Despite Apple releasing a patch for Java, the Flashback Trojan has infected 600,000 Macs, according to reports. As a result, there are 600,000 Macs being remotely controlled by the growing Mac botnet, according to Russian antivirus company Dr. Web

The majority of the botnet computers are located in the United States and Canada, according to Dr. Web. The company says: “This once again refutes claims by some experts that there are no cyber-threats to Mac OS X.”

According to Dr. Web, systems get infected with BackDoor.Flashback.39 after a user is redirected to a bogus site from a compromised resource or via a traffic distribution system. JavaScript code is used to load a Java applet containing an exploit.

“Attackers began to exploit CVE-2011-3544 and CVE-2008-5353 vulnerabilities to spread malware in February 2012, and after March 16 they switched to another exploit (CVE-2012-0507). The vulnerability has been closed by Apple only on April 3 2012,” writes Dr. Web on their website. More information about the Mac botnet is available here.

Apple released the patch a day after reports spread about a Java-based Trojan horse that could install itself on your Mac without requiring that you enter a password. Apple released Java for OS X Lion 2012-001 and Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 7, and if you haven’t yet installed it, you should.

Flashback is a Mac Trojan horse that’s been in the public eye since it was uncovered by security firm Intego last year. The recent update saw it gain the ability to infect your computer from little more than a visit to a website.

Originally, Flashback masqueraded as an installer for Adobe’s Flash Player, hence the name, but the malware has changed tacks at last once since then, instead pretending to be a Mac software update or a Java updater.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1e1f13df/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C334940A0A0Capple0Emac0Eflashback0Ebotnet0Enow0Enumbers0Eover0E60A0A0A0A0A0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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Fla. officer pulled over by trooper on video gets community service

By Hank Tester and Brian Hamacher NBC-6 TV Miami

MIAMI — The Miami Police officer who was arrested for reckless driving by a Florida Highway Patrol trooper after he was spotted driving 120 mph on the Turnpike was in court Thursday where he pleaded no contest.

Officer Fausto Lopez will have to complete 100 hours of community service and pay $3,300 for the cost of prosecution, Broward Judge Melinda Brown ruled.

Lopez immediately handed over a check and if he completes the community service within six months, nothing will appear on his record.

Full Story: Speeding Miami cop gets 100 hours community service

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Over Half a Million Macs Infected by Flashback Trojan

The majority of the infected computers are located in the U.S. and Canada, according to Doctor Web.

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Sheriff’s official investigated over inmate golf

Associated Press LOS ANGELES — A yellow jail jumpsuit isn't the usual golf wear. But Canadian pro golfer-turned-thief Frank Carrillo says that's what he wore when a sheriff's official took him to a Catalina Island golf course to offer pointers.

Los Angeles County Capt. Jeff Donahue is under investigation for allegations of having an inappropriate relationship with an inmate, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Donahue, who heads the sheriff's force at Avalon that polices California's Catalina, nearby islands and waters, is on medical leave. A message left at the station seeking comment was not immediately returned Thursday.

Carrillo, 41, was serving two years after pleading guilty to stealing cash and jewelry from people at golf courses — including the World Series ring of former Dodgers catcher Jimmy Campanis. He has since been released.

He was at the Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles when his good behavior helped earn him a transfer to sunny Catalina, where he became a trusty.

"It was like camp," he said.

Word got around that he had been a professional golfer in Canada and after meeting Donahue, Carrillo suggested the idea that they play some golf.

"I knew it was a crazy thing to say," Carrillo told the Times. "But the first thing he said was, `Maybe I need a few pointers.'"

The captain escorted him in a patrol Jeep to a hilltop golf course when Carrillo gave him pointers to reduce a double-digit handicap last summer, Carrillo said.

"They don't really have a driving range. It's a net," he said.

Carrillo believes that the captain benefited from his advice. "He kind of has this swing that's old school and risky, but he hits it every time," Carrillo said. "I would probably say he's a 14 or 15 handicap. Not too bad."

The trip proved divisive among deputies at the station, where some had no problem while others thought it was illegal, according to Deputy William Cordero. Cordero, who disapproved, filed a claim contending that other deputies harassed him when he spoke out about the incident. He has since been transferred.

His claim alleges that Sheriff Lee Baca approved the outing. Carrillo said Baca knew him from charity golf tournaments, spoke to him during a tour of the Avalon station and did seem to approve of the golf trip.

Sheriff's spokesman Steve Whitmore disputed those claims.

"They may have said hello, a conversation may have occurred, but Baca never condoned this guy going out and playing golf," Whitmore said. "He would never do that. He would never condone taking a trusty out and having them go play golf."

Copyright 2012 Associated Press

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Updated Android malware can take over your phone

A customized variant of Android malware is now worming its way onto nonrooted devices and taking them over, and the weapon requires no interaction from the victim to begin its campaign.

Researchers at the mobile security firm Lookout identified the reworked malware as Legacy Native (LeNa), which poses as a legitimate app to gain unauthorized privileges on Android phones.

LeNa has long plagued Android users, Lookout said, but in its reworked form, it no longer requires its target phone to be rooted, and can now activate its payload — it connects to remote servers, transmits sensitive phone information and drops more rigged software onto the phone — without any complicity from the end user.

The new Android malware disguises itself in fully functional copies of apps, including “Angry Birds Space,” and hides its malicious payload in the string of code at the end of an otherwise genuine JPEG file, Lookout said. This rogue code exploits the GingerBreak vulnerability, a flaw that enables it to gain control of the phone and trick the victim into purchasing apps from illegitimate app stores.

The risks of downloading LeNa are not currently high; it has not been found in the Google Play market (formerly the Android App Market), and has only been spotted in unauthorized, third-party Chinese-language app markets.

Before you download any app, check the permissions it requests; if you’re uncomfortable with the amount of access to your phone an app wants, don’t download it. Review the app, its developer and its ratings and customer reviews. Check for unusual behaviors on your phone that may indicate its been infected, and scan your phone bill for any unauthorized texts and charges.

© 2012 SecurityNewsDaily. All rights reserved

Article source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46953131/ns/technology_and_science-security/

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