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Google’s New ‘Bouncer’ Targets Android Market Malware

Hard on the heels of the controversy that arose recently around Symantec and its claims that numerous apps on the Android Market were actually malware in disguise, Google on Thursday unveiled a new tool to help it identify malicious apps.

Symantec subsequently recanted its assertions, of course, but in the meantime there’s now a service called “Bouncer” that aims to keep the Android Market free of malware by quietly and automatically scanning it for questionable apps.

“Today we’re revealing a service we’ve developed, codenamed Bouncer, which provides automated scanning of Android Market for potentially malicious software without disrupting the user experience of Android Market or requiring developers to go through an application approval process,” wrote Hiroshi Lockheimer, vice president of engineering for Android, in a Thursday post on the Google Mobile Blog.

‘We Actually Run Every Application’

When an application is uploaded, Bouncer immediately starts analyzing it for known malware, spyware, and trojans, Lockheimer explained. The service also looks for suspicious behaviors and compares it against previously analyzed apps to detect possible red flags, he noted.

“We actually run every application on Google’s cloud infrastructure and simulate how it will run on an Android device to look for hidden, malicious behavior,” Lockheimer wrote.

New developer accounts are also analyzed so as to help prevent the return of developers who have submitted malicious software in the past, he added.

A 40 Percent Drop

Bouncer has actually already been at work in the Android Market for some time already, Lockheimer added, and it’s turned up some interesting results.

Though more than 11 billion apps were downloaded from the Android Market over the past year, the number of Android malware downloads is decreasing dramatically, he asserted.

Specifically, between the first and second halves of 2011, there was a 40 percent drop in the number of downloads of potentially malicious software from the Android Market, he wrote.

In fact, “this drop occurred at the same time that companies who market and sell anti-malware and security software have been reporting that malicious applications are on the rise,” Lockheimer pointed out.

No ‘Walled Garden’

Indeed, last fall saw several dire warnings of a “mobile malware crisis” looming on the horizon, so it’s good to hear some concrete data putting such claims in perspective.

At the same time, it’s also good to see Google adding to Linux-based Android’s arsenal of protections, which already include sandboxing, a rigorous permissions system, and the ability to remove malware easily, as Lockheimer notes.

No platform has perfect security, of course. Still, the addition of Bouncer adds one more level of protection while still avoiding the constraints of an Apple-style “walled garden.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/249271/googles_new_bouncer_targets_android_market_malware.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Trojan gang targets BT, Talk Talk and Sky customers

Criminals using a dangerous variant of the Zeus bank Trojan have started hacking BT, Talk Talk and Sky phone accounts as a way of redirecting phone calls from bank fraud services away from victims.

As with other financial malware, the Ice IX Trojan is designed to steal bank logins, emptying accounts of much money as it can without setting off the bank’s fraud protection systems that normally pick up on odd or unusually large transactions.

Security company Trusteer has discovered that criminals controlling Ice IX are now throwing up a browser screen as part of the web injection hijacking process that tries to engineer users into give up phone service logins too.

Armed with this data – plus keylogged passwords for the same service – criminals then try to set calls to forward to a number controlled by them.  Banks that phone users to query transactions would then be told by imposters that transfers were genuine.

Screens have been discovered for three of the UK’s largest phone providers, BT, Talk Talk and Sky, but it is likely that almost any provider could be targeted.

”Faudsters are increasingly turning to these post-transaction attack methods to hide fraudulent activity from the victim and block email and phone communication from the bank,” said Trusteer CTO, Amit Klein.

“This allows attackers to circumvent security mechanisms that look for anomalies once transactions have already been executed by the user.”

Ice IX is one of a number of versions built using the source code from the most prodigious banking malware ever to appear, Zeus. Over time, attacks crafted using this family of malware have become increasingly targeted, with the phone service ruse another example of that phenomenon.

Malware gangs are wary of post-transaction verification and will typically test the system to work out the fraud threshold for different institutions and customers.

In one recent example, a New Jersey County lost $19,000 from a business account that had been compromised by Zeus, despite the fact that it contained $13 million in funds. The best explanation for this criminal modesty is that the gang attacking the account wanted to keep its theft as discrete as possible in the short term to avoid detection.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1c585761/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33346820Ctrojan0Egang0Etargets0Ebt0Etalk0Etalk0Esky0Ecustomers0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

Hacker group Anonymous targets Mexican sites

The activist hacker group Anonymous attacked three Mexican government websites on Friday in protest at a proposed bill that seeks to toughen local laws about online file-sharing.

The affected sites belong to the Interior Ministry, the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. The homepage of the Interior Ministry remained offline by mid-afternoon.

“We demand the Mexican government not continue with this law because they will take away our freedom of speech and file sharing,” Anonymous said in a video posted on Youtube ahead of Friday’s action.

The proposed law, floated last month by a senator from the ruling National Action Party, Federico Doring, would criminalize the uploading of music, videos or books to the Internet without the permission of copyright holders.

Anonymous members and their supporters took to Twitter to coordinate the attacks under the hashtag “#OpDoring” with messages including “Senate TANGO DOWN !! FIREEE don’t hesitate to shoot” and “Change of target deputies … FIRE.”

Interior Minister Alejandro Poire confirmed his ministry’s website had been hit by a denial-of-service attack. He said the government was working to prevent such strikes, and that it would investigate and prosecute any crimes committed.

“We will certainly verify the security protocols of the ministry’s website to ensure the integrity of its information and prevent future attacks,” he said.

Anonymous, a loosely knit group that has attacked financial and government websites around the world, compared Doring’s proposal with anti-piracy bills in the United States that were halted after a huge online protest this month.

The hacker group had clashed with Mexican officials before. Anonymous claimed responsibility in September after the websites of several Mexican government ministries, including Defense and Public Security, went offline.

Copyright 2012 Thomson Reuters. Click for restrictions.

Article source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46169194/ns/technology_and_science-security/

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15. Hacker group Anonymous targets Mexican websites

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – The activist hacker group Anonymous attacked three Mexican government websites on Friday in protest at a proposed bill that seeks to toughen local laws about online file-sharing.

The affected sites belong to the Interior Ministry, the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. The homepage of the Interior Ministry remained offline by mid-afternoon.

“We demand the Mexican government not continue with this law because they will take away our freedom of speech and file sharing,” Anonymous said in a video posted on Youtube ahead of Friday’s action.

The proposed law, floated last month by a senator from the ruling National Action Party, Federico Doring, would criminalize the uploading of music, videos or books to the Internet without the permission of copyright holders.

Anonymous members and their supporters took to Twitter to coordinate the attacks under the hashtag “#OpDoring” with messages including “Senate TANGO DOWN !! FIREEE don’t hesitate to shoot” and “Change of target deputies … FIRE.”

Interior Minister Alejandro Poire confirmed his ministry’s website had been hit by a denial-of-service attack. He said the government was working to prevent such strikes, and that it would investigate and prosecute any crimes committed.

“We will certainly verify the security protocols of the ministry’s website to ensure the integrity of its information and prevent future attacks,” he said.

Anonymous, a loosely knit group that has attacked financial and government websites around the world, compared Doring’s proposal with anti-piracy bills in the United States that were halted after a huge online protest this month.

The hacker group had clashed with Mexican officials before. Anonymous claimed responsibility in September after the websites of several Mexican government ministries, including Defense and Public Security, went offline.

Article source: http://thestar.com.my.feedsportal.com/c/33048/f/534599/s/1c3325e5/l/0Lthestar0N0Bmy0Cnews0Cstory0Basp0Dfile0F0C20A120C10C280Creutersworld0C20A120A1280A6560A90Gsec0Freutersworld/story01.htm

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Hacker group Anonymous targets Mexican websites

The activist hacker group Anonymous attacked three Mexican government websites on Friday in protest at a proposed bill that seeks to toughen local laws about online file-sharing. The affected sites belong …

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Sykipot Malware Targets DoD Smart Cards

A new version of the malware is designed to steal smart card credentials from users at the U.S. Department of Defense and other organizations.

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Malware Attack Targets U.S. Government Agencies [VIDEO] (Mashable)

Mashable – [brightcove video="1389085133001" /]
Sykipot, malware believed to originate in China, has been used to target smart cards in the Pentagon and other government agencies. According to security researcher AlienVault, a new variant of Sykipot is targeting the cards government employees use to access secure networks and servers.

View full post on Yahoo! News: Security News

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‘Saudi’ hacker targets Israel with Trojan horse virus

A self-defined “Saudi hacker” who twice this week posted details of thousands of Israeli credit cards hit again on Friday with a new Internet file containing a Trojan horse virus, public radio said.

According to the report, the hacker who goes by the name “0xOmar” posted what appeared to be credit card details, but was in fact malware that could seriously damage users who downloaded it.

On Thursday, the Saudi hacker from group-xp published details of more than 6,000 Israeli credit cards online in the second such incident in three days, army radio reported.

Details of the latest incident were revealed on Thursday in a Internet posting by 0xOmar from group-xp who said he had posted details of 11,000 cards online.

But Israel‘s three major credit card companies said the number of cards affected was only 6,050, the radio reported.

Earlier this week, 0xOmar posted a message on an Israeli sports website saying group-xp, which he described as the “greatest Saudi Arabian hacker team” had posted details of 400,000 Israeli cards online.

After examining the details, Israel’s major credit card companies said only 14,000 valid cards had been exposed.

“I have added another 11,000 credit cards which contains IsraCards and DinnerDash cards,” 0xOmar wrote in his posting.

“This database contains 60,000 credit cards which also has MasterCard and Visa cards, but I’ll send them later among with a lot of others,” he said, claiming to have also hacked data from Israeli military contractor firms.

Yoram HaCohen, a senior justice ministry official, told army radio he was “not so worried about the credit cards themselves” which could be cancelled, but about “the personal information which has been exposed, such as email addresses, passwords and ID card numbers.”

He admitted it would be “difficult to track down the hackers behind these attacks because they take good precautions,” and said Israel may turn to Interpol.

Meanwhile, Israeli news website Ynet reported that an Israeli computer expert claimed to have uncovered the true identity of 0xOmar — a 19-year-old Mexican waiter called Omar Habib.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/hackers-expose-more-israeli-credit-card-details-132048796.html

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Saudi Hacker Targets More Israelis

The Saudi hacker who released the credit card details of thousands of Israelis has released 11,000 more.

The hacker, a member of the Saudi hacking group Group-XP named OxOmar, said Thursday in an Internet message that he has hacked some 80 Israeli websites and will release a total of 1 million credit card numbers with personal information.

According to credit card companies, the information released Thursday is newly issued cards that were canceled by the companies before any transactions were carried out.

Earlier this week the hacker released a list of 400,000 credit cards with personal information, but with duplicates and false information the number of cardholders affected was approximately 15,000.

OxOmar told Ynet in an e-mail interview that he also will release documents from military contractors and companies that manufacture surveillance equipment.

Article source: http://www.jewishtimes.com/index.php/jewishtimes/news/jt/israel_news/saudi_hacker_targets_more_israelis/28363

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

‘Saudi’ hacker targets Israel with Trojan horse virus

A self-defined “Saudi hacker” who twice this week posted details of thousands of Israeli credit cards hit again on Friday with a new Internet file containing a Trojan horse virus, public radio said.

According to the report, the hacker who goes by the name “0xOmar” posted what appeared to be credit card details, but was in fact malware that could seriously damage users who downloaded it.

On Thursday, the Saudi hacker from group-xp published details of more than 6,000 Israeli credit cards online in the second such incident in three days, army radio reported.

Details of the latest incident were revealed on Thursday in a Internet posting by 0xOmar from group-xp who said he had posted details of 11,000 cards online.

But Israel‘s three major credit card companies said the number of cards affected was only 6,050, the radio reported.

Earlier this week, 0xOmar posted a message on an Israeli sports website saying group-xp, which he described as the “greatest Saudi Arabian hacker team” had posted details of 400,000 Israeli cards online.

After examining the details, Israel’s major credit card companies said only 14,000 valid cards had been exposed.

“I have added another 11,000 credit cards which contains IsraCards and DinnerDash cards,” 0xOmar wrote in his posting.

“This database contains 60,000 credit cards which also has MasterCard and Visa cards, but I’ll send them later among with a lot of others,” he said, claiming to have also hacked data from Israeli military contractor firms.

Yoram HaCohen, a senior justice ministry official, told army radio he was “not so worried about the credit cards themselves” which could be cancelled, but about “the personal information which has been exposed, such as email addresses, passwords and ID card numbers.”

He admitted it would be “difficult to track down the hackers behind these attacks because they take good precautions,” and said Israel may turn to Interpol.

Meanwhile, Israeli news website Ynet reported that an Israeli computer expert claimed to have uncovered the true identity of 0xOmar — a 19-year-old Mexican waiter called Omar Habib.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/hackers-expose-more-israeli-credit-card-details-132048796.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Computer Hacking

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