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HP Performance Manager security vulnerabilities

<!– HP Performance Manager security vulnerabilities –>

 
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<!–
google_ad_client = “pub-9080155680222782″;
google_ad_width = 468;
google_ad_height = 15;
google_ad_format = “468x15_0ads_al”;
//2007-01-19: Inside
google_ad_channel = “6209105484″;
google_color_border = “333333″;
google_color_bg = “0D0030″;
google_color_link = “AAAAAA”;
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src=”http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js” –>

BUGTRAQSecurityVulns ID:12297Type:HP : HP Performance Manager 9.00CVE:CVE-2012-0127 (Unspecified vulnerability in HP Performance Manager 9.00 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via unknown vectors.)Original documentHP, [security bulletin] HPSBMU02756 SSRT100596 rev.1 – HP Performance Manager Running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris and Windows, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS) (02.04.2012)Discuss:Read or add your comments to this news (0 comments)



Article source: http://securityvulns.com/news/HP/PM/1204.html

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HP Performance Manager security vulnerabilities

<!– HP Performance Manager security vulnerabilities –>

 
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<!–
google_ad_client = “pub-9080155680222782″;
google_ad_width = 468;
google_ad_height = 15;
google_ad_format = “468x15_0ads_al”;
//2007-01-19: Inside
google_ad_channel = “6209105484″;
google_color_border = “333333″;
google_color_bg = “0D0030″;
google_color_link = “AAAAAA”;
google_color_text = “999999″;
google_color_url = “C0C0C0″;
//–><!– script type="text/javascript"
src=”http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js” –>

BUGTRAQSecurityVulns ID:12297Type:HP : HP Performance Manager 9.00CVE:CVE-2012-0127 (Unspecified vulnerability in HP Performance Manager 9.00 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via unknown vectors.)Original documentHP, [security bulletin] HPSBMU02756 SSRT100596 rev.1 – HP Performance Manager Running on HP-UX, Linux, Solaris and Windows, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS) (02.04.2012)Discuss:Read or add your comments to this news (0 comments)



Article source: http://securityvulns.com/news/HP/PM/1204.html

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McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance multiple security vulnerabilities

<!– McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance multiple security vulnerabilities –>

 
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<!–
google_ad_client = “pub-9080155680222782″;
google_ad_width = 468;
google_ad_height = 15;
google_ad_format = “468x15_0ads_al”;
//2007-01-19: Inside
google_ad_channel = “6209105484″;
google_color_border = “333333″;
google_color_bg = “0D0030″;
google_color_link = “AAAAAA”;
google_color_text = “999999″;
google_color_url = “C0C0C0″;
//–><!– script type="text/javascript"
src=”http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js” –>

BUGTRAQSecurityVulns ID:12296Type:MCAFEE : McAfee Email and Web Security 5.6 MCAFEE : McAfee Email Gateway 7.0Original documentResearch@NGSSecure, NGS00158 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Arbitrary file download is possible with a crafted URL when logged in as any user (02.04.2012) Research@NGSSecure, NGS00157 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Password hashes can be recovered from a system backup and easily cracked (02.04.2012) Research@NGSSecure, NGS00156 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Active sesssion tokens of other users are disclosed within the UI (02.04.2012) Research@NGSSecure, NGS00155 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Any logged-in user can bypass controls to reset passwords of other administrators (02.04.2012) Research@NGSSecure, NGS00154 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Session hijacking and bypassing client-side session timeouts (02.04.2012) Research@NGSSecure, NGS00153 Patch Notification: McAfee Email and Web Security Appliance v5.6 – Reflective XSS allowing an attacker to gain session tokens (02.04.2012)Discuss:Read or add your comments to this news (0 comments)



Article source: http://securityvulns.com/news/McAfee/EWSA.html

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Flash Player 11.2 fixes critical vulnerabilities and adds silent updates

Adobe have released Flash Player 11.2, addressing two critical arbitrary code execution vulnerabilities and introducing a silent update option.

One of the patched vulnerabilities stems from how older versions of Flash Player checks URL security domains, and only affects the Flash Player ActiveX plug-in for Internet Explorer on Windows 7 or Vista.

Both vulnerabilities can trigger memory corruptions and can be exploited to execute arbitrary code remotely. However, Adobe is not aware of any exploits for these flaws being used in online attacks at this time, said Wiebke Lips, Adobe’s senior manager of corporate communications.

Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.1.102.63 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris are advised to update to the new Adobe Flash Player 11.2 for their respective platforms. Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.7 for Android are advised to update to Flash Player 11.1.111.8.

Flash Player 11.2 also introduces a new updating mechanism that can be configured to check for and deploy updates in the background automatically, without requiring user interaction. The feature has been in Adobe’s plans for a long time and is expected to decrease the number of outdated Flash Player installations that attackers can target.

“The new background updater will provide a better experience for our customers, and it will allow us to more rapidly respond to zero-day attacks,” said Peleus Uhley, platform security strategist at Adobe. “This model for updating users is similar to the Google Chrome update experience, and Google has had great success with this approach. We are hoping to have similar success.”

The move was welcomed by Thomas Kristensen, chief security officer at Secunia, which develops the popular Personal Software Inspector (PSI) patch management program.

“A silent and automatic updating mechanism for Flash would help the majority of users. A more consistent and rapid updating of the user base is likely to impact the attackers’ preferences for Flash,” he said.

Of course, this will only happen after the vast majority of users upgrade to Flash Player 11.2 or a later version using the old method that requires explicit approval.

When Adobe Flash Player 11.2 is installed, users are asked to choose an update method. The available choices are: install updates automatically when available (recommended), notify me when updates are available, and never check for updates (not recommended).

The silent updater will try to contact Adobe’s update server every hour until it succeeds. If it receives a valid response from the server that no update is available, it will wait 24 hours before checking again.

For now, the automatic update option is only available for Flash Player on Windows, but Adobe is working on implementing it for Mac versions as well, Uhley said.

However, even if the automatic update option is enabled, Adobe will decide on a case-by-case basis which updates will be deployed silently and which won’t. Those that change the Flash Player default settings will require user interaction.

The new updater will update all Flash Player browser plug-ins installed on the system at the same time. “This will solve the problem of end-users having to update Flash Player for Internet Explorer separately from Flash Player for their other open source browsers,” Uhley said.

In addition to keeping the Flash Player install base up to date more easily and reducing the time required to effectively respond to zero-day attacks – attacks that exploit previously unknown vulnerabilities – the new silent updater could also reduce the number of scams that distribute malware as Flash Player updates.

“The pretext of a Flash Player update has been intensively used by cyber-crooks to lure users into downloading malicious content,” said Bogdan Botezatu, a senior e-threat analyst at antivirus vendor BitDefender. “By eliminating the update wizard, users will likely get more difficult to con on the pretext of a legitimate update required by an application they trust.”

Unfortunately, this silent update model can’t be applied to all applications, Botezatu said. He gave the example of Internet Explorer 6, which Microsoft is trying to phase out, but that companies still widely use because their business applications are dependent on it and don’t work on newer versions.

Adobe is doing its part to convince users to move away from Internet Explorer 6 by dropping support for the browser from upcoming Flash Player versions. “We will no longer include testing on Internet Explorer 6 in our certification process and strongly encourage users to upgrade to the newest version of Internet Explorer,” Uhley said.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/3551/s/1de731e0/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33478370Cflash0Eplayer0E1120Efixes0Ecritical0Evulnerabilities0Eadds0Esilent0Eupdates0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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Tibet.A malware for OS X uses Flashback Java vulnerabilities

One recent malware program for OS X that has caused concern has been the Flashback Trojan, which in its latest variants has taken advantage of Java security holes to embed code in programs or user accounts that will launch the malware when Web browsers are used. Once run, the malware tries taking screenshots and otherwise collect information to upload to remote servers.

Apparently the Java exploit used in this malware is catching on, and other malware have been developing that uses the same route of attack. Recently Intego reported on a new Trojan horse called Tibet.A (in its first revision), which downloads a Java applet when you visit a malicious Web page (URLs to such are apparently being sent via e-mail spam links), and installs a backdoor program. This malware works on Windows PCs and OS X. Apparently the Web page involved will determine the platform being used and will send the appropriate binaries to the computer.

As with the Flashback malware, since this vulnerability only requires access to the user’s account, no password is required to run or install it, provided users are running older versions of Java and have Java enabled on their browsers. The malware is similar in other respects to the Flashback threat; however, both can be easily thwarted by disabling Java on systems that are not updated (simply unchecking Java in the
Safari security preferences will do this), or by using Software Update to update the systems.

Putting the
Mac Malware scene into perspective, this threat is not known to be widespread and appears to be used in a direct attack that targets Tibetan businesses and organizations. It is also a single addition to the small group of malware that has currently been developed for OS X, which at less than 70 variants is minuscule in comparison to the millions developed yearly for Windows PCs. Additionally, this and the vast majority of known malware for OS X are Trojan horse based threats, and are not viral in nature, meaning they do not spread uncontrollably on their own and require tricking the user (in this case with spam) to install.

So far, the spam e-mails, including links to the malicious Web pages, have only been sent to the Tibetan organizations; however, it is possible that they could be issued elsewhere. Despite this possibility, the chances that this will affect the average user are slim, especially if you follow some simple (and perhaps understood) guidelines:

  1. Update your system
    If your system is updated, then you have nothing to worry about, so be sure to regularly run Software Update and keep your system updated.
  2. Avoid e-mail links
    E-mail clients by themselves will not open links unless you specify them to, and therefore if you get an e-mail from an unknown source (especially if it contains misspellings, requests to click links, and other requests for information), then avoid it; simply delete the message. If you are uncertain how to identify spam e-mails, then do a Web search for “How to spot spam e-mail” or similar string, and get numerous pages outlining handy tips on the details to look for.
  3. Turn off unnecessary features
    While in some cases Java, Web plug-ins like Flash, and similar features are used quite regularly, if you do not use them regularly then turn them off. You can do this for Safari in its Security preferences by unchecking the “Enable Java” feature, and in other Web browsers such as
    Firefox you have access to many Plug-in management tools (which Safari unfortunately lacks at the moment), where you can enable or disable individual plug-ins. If you ultimately need a plug-in or Java, then the Web page you are visiting will notify you of this, and you can quickly enable it to view the content you are trying to see.

    While keeping plug-ins and other features disabled until needed does add a touch of inconvenience to Web browsing, it overall closes possible avenues for attack.

Overall, while this malware is new, its route of attack is not and if you have already taken measures to safeguard your system by updating it, then you are well protected from this malware. If you still have concerns, then you can block this malware further by installing a malware scanner such as Intego’s VirusBarrier X6, Sophos, or numerous others, but you do not need to go overboard and have these programs continually scan your system and block all services. Above all, as with any computer system, safe browsing practices and regular updates are the easiest way to ensure you cover your bases.


Questions? Comments? Have a fix? Post them below or e-mail us!
Be sure to check us out on Twitter and the CNET Mac forums.

Article source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-57405449-263/tibet.a-malware-for-os-x-uses-flashback-java-vulnerabilities/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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libzip securitty vulnerabilities

<!– libzip securitty vulnerabilities –>

 
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<!–
google_ad_client = “pub-9080155680222782″;
google_ad_width = 468;
google_ad_height = 15;
google_ad_format = “468x15_0ads_al”;
//2007-01-19: Inside
google_ad_channel = “6209105484″;
google_color_border = “333333″;
google_color_bg = “0D0030″;
google_color_link = “AAAAAA”;
google_color_text = “999999″;
google_color_url = “C0C0C0″;
//–><!– script type="text/javascript"
src=”http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js” –>

BUGTRAQSecurityVulns ID:12285Type:LIBZIP : libzip 0.10CVE:CVE-2012-1163 CVE-2012-1162Original documentMANDRIVA, [ MDVSA-2012:034 ] libzip (25.03.2012)Discuss:Read or add your comments to this news (0 comments)



test server

Article source: http://securityvulns.com/news/libzip/1203.html

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12.11.11 IBM DB2 Multiple Security Vulnerabilities

CVEs: CVE: Not Available

Platform: Cross Platform

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12.10.9 Ruby on Rails Multiple Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities

CVEs: CVE: Not Available

Platform: Cross Platform

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12.9.7 Csound “getnum()” Multiple Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities

CVEs: CVE: CVE-2012-0270

Platform: Cross Platform

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(1) HIGH: Oracle Java Multiple Security Vulnerabilities

Category: Widely Deployed Software

Affected:

  • Oracle Java 7 Update 2 and prior

View full post on @RISK: The Consensus Security Alert

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