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Facebook teams up with Microsoft, McAfee, Symantec to sell antivirus

Facebook has teamed up with five security vendors to offer a range of free and subscription-based antivirus packages.

Microsoft, McAfee, TrendMicro, Sophos, and Symantec are now part of Facebook’s third party security providers, offering a range of antivirus packages for Windows and Mac users.

The vendors have become part of the social network’s “Facebook Security Family“, which could be a major boon for security vendors who now may reach Facebook’s 900 million users.

The new security family is an addition to Facebook’s anti-scam program, which includes partnerships with Web of Trust, and its own internally developed URL screening program assisted by McAfee, Google, and Websense.

Facebook promotes the products as “free”, however some, such as Symantec’s Norton and McAfee, similar to pre-installed desktop antivirus trial versions, must be paid for after 6 months, while Microsoft’s Security Essentials for Windows and Sophos’Home Edition for Macs are actually free products.

The vendors, most of whom already have a significant following community on Facebook, have been invited to contribute to Facebook’s security blog.

Facebook claims that less than 4 per cent of content shared on its network is spam whereas 90 per cent of email is spam.

Despite its efforts to cut spam and malware from the social network, scammers have found novel ways to exploit the platform. One recent example involved a combined fake Adobe Flash extension attack distributed on Google’s Chrome Web Store that hijacked Facebook victim’s accounts in order to sell fraudulent Facebook “Likes”.

Facebook provides useful tips on how to avoid scams on its security home page.

Security researcher Daniel Peck outlined a number of tricks attackers use to compromise and attract attention of would-be victims here.

In 2011 so-called spam king Sanford Wallace faced fraud charges for compromising Facebook accounts and sending 27 million spam messages between 2008 and 2009.

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Hacker Looking For US Military Documents Finds VMWare Source Code

Michael Harper for RedOrbit.com Members from the hacktivist group “LulzSec” are at it again, as source code from VMWare’s ESX hypervisor technology has been leaked to a website used to anonymously host hacked files. According to a company blog , VMWare has said a “single file” from their ESX source code had been leaked and posted to Pastebin . The company also went on to say the source code is 8 …

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Amazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud

Amazon Web Services is attempting coax businesses into the cloud by touting the security credentials of its Virtual Private Cloud (VPC).Amazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud, Blog, Enterprise, virtual, cloud, Amazon, private, woos

Amazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud, Blog, Enterprise, virtual, cloud, Amazon, private, woos Amazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud, Blog, Enterprise, virtual, cloud, Amazon, private, woos

Amazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud, Blog, Enterprise, virtual, cloud, Amazon, private, woosAmazon woos enterprise with Virtual Private Cloud, Blog, Enterprise, virtual, cloud, Amazon, private, woos

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Telecomm Industry Fully Supports CISPA Passage

In Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith, there’s a quote fitting the Telecommunications Industry’s reaction to the House of Representatives passing CISPA, saying “So this is how liberty dies, with thunderous applause. ” While a little bombastic, considering …

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Bringing the Unsexy Back: The Process of Selling SE Penetration Tests

By Chris Hadnagy

For the past few months, I’ve brought you articles on launching your career as a social engineer, the psychology and history behind hacking humans and even some scams you can pull on your clients for their own good. As wonderful as it is to talk about the methods, the tricks and the sexy stories of social engineering pwnage, we need to take a step back and discuss the business end of this spectrum.

Yes, I said it… business side. After all, most of us reading this article either are in IT/Security or want to be….

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Microsoft Warns of Conficker Worm Threat

The latest Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIR) has complied new data taken from over 600 million systems worldwide, and has found that iterations of the Conficker worm have appeared on roughly 220 million computers over the past 2.5 years. This …

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One in five Macs carries Windows malware, study finds

Macs are more likely to carry Windows malware than Mac malware, according to a survey. This is not a massive surprise, given the shear numbers of Windows malware, but it is a reminder that it exists even on the Mac platform. This Windows malware is inactive and can’t do any harm, unless that computer has Windows installed as a secondary OS. Mac users also need to be aware that they could pass on the malware to Windows using friends and collegues via file sharing, USB memory sticks, external hard disk drives and other removable media devices.

One in five Mac computers is likely to carry Windows malware, but only one in 36 is likely to be infected with malware specifically designed for the Mac OS X, according to the study by Sophos. Sophos collected malware detection statistics from 100,000 Mac computers that run its free antivirus product and found that 20 percent of them contained one or more types of Windows malware.


Sophos’ analysis also revealed that 2.7 percent of the 100,000 scanned Macs were actually infected with Mac OS X malware and a large part of those infections, 75 percent, were with the Flashback Trojan.

Flashback is a family of Mac OS X malware distributed through social engineering and automated Web exploits. Sophos’ products detect applications from this malware family as OSX/Flshplyr.

A recent Flashback variant that appeared at the end of March and spread by exploiting a vulnerability in the Java browser plug-in, managed to infect almost 700,000 Mac computers.

Around 650,000 Macs are still infected with it, despite Apple releasing a patch for the Java vulnerability and a Flashback removal tool, according to a report released on Friday by antivirus firm Doctor Web. According to reports, a new version of Flashback eludes Apple’s XProtect

The second most common type of malware detected by Sophos’ Mac antivirus product was OSX/FakeAV, with 18 percent of the total. OSX/FakeAV is a family of Mac OS X scareware applications that includes fake antivirus programs like Mac Defender, which first appeared in May 2011.

OSX/RSPlug, a Mac OS X version of the DNSChanger computer Trojan, was the third most common detection and accounted for 5.5 percent of the total. This malware forces infected computers to use rogue DNS (Domain Name System) servers controlled by attackers.

The rogue DNS servers used by the DNSChanger botnet were seized by the FBI last year and were temporarily replaced with good ones, to allow the malware’s victims to clean their computers.

The replacement servers are scheduled to be shut down on July 9, but according to the FBI, there are still 350,000 computers infected with the malware. If the servers are shut down, those computers will no longer be able to access the Internet.

“Some Apple fans might feel relieved that they are seven times more likely to have Windows malware on their Macs than Mac OS X-specific threats, but they shouldn’t be,” said Graham Cluley, a senior technology consultant at Sophos, in a blog post on Tuesday. “What Mac users really need to do is protect their computers now (there really is no excuse, free anti-virus software is available for Mac home users), or risk allowing the malware problem on Macs to become as big as the problem on PCs in the future.”

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

One in five Macs carries Windows malware, study finds

Macs are more likely to carry Windows malware than Mac malware, according to a survey. This is not a massive surprise, given the shear numbers of Windows malware, but it is a reminder that it exists even on the Mac platform. This Windows malware is inactive and can’t do any harm, unless that computer has Windows installed as a secondary OS. Mac users also need to be aware that they could pass on the malware to Windows using friends and collegues via file sharing, USB memory sticks, external hard disk drives and other removable media devices.

One in five Mac computers is likely to carry Windows malware, but only one in 36 is likely to be infected with malware specifically designed for the Mac OS X, according to the study by Sophos. Sophos collected malware detection statistics from 100,000 Mac computers that run its free antivirus product and found that 20 percent of them contained one or more types of Windows malware.


Sophos’ analysis also revealed that 2.7 percent of the 100,000 scanned Macs were actually infected with Mac OS X malware and a large part of those infections, 75 percent, were with the Flashback Trojan.

Flashback is a family of Mac OS X malware distributed through social engineering and automated Web exploits. Sophos’ products detect applications from this malware family as OSX/Flshplyr.

A recent Flashback variant that appeared at the end of March and spread by exploiting a vulnerability in the Java browser plug-in, managed to infect almost 700,000 Mac computers.

Around 650,000 Macs are still infected with it, despite Apple releasing a patch for the Java vulnerability and a Flashback removal tool, according to a report released on Friday by antivirus firm Doctor Web. According to reports, a new version of Flashback eludes Apple’s XProtect

The second most common type of malware detected by Sophos’ Mac antivirus product was OSX/FakeAV, with 18 percent of the total. OSX/FakeAV is a family of Mac OS X scareware applications that includes fake antivirus programs like Mac Defender, which first appeared in May 2011.

OSX/RSPlug, a Mac OS X version of the DNSChanger computer Trojan, was the third most common detection and accounted for 5.5 percent of the total. This malware forces infected computers to use rogue DNS (Domain Name System) servers controlled by attackers.

The rogue DNS servers used by the DNSChanger botnet were seized by the FBI last year and were temporarily replaced with good ones, to allow the malware’s victims to clean their computers.

The replacement servers are scheduled to be shut down on July 9, but according to the FBI, there are still 350,000 computers infected with the malware. If the servers are shut down, those computers will no longer be able to access the Internet.

“Some Apple fans might feel relieved that they are seven times more likely to have Windows malware on their Macs than Mac OS X-specific threats, but they shouldn’t be,” said Graham Cluley, a senior technology consultant at Sophos, in a blog post on Tuesday. “What Mac users really need to do is protect their computers now (there really is no excuse, free anti-virus software is available for Mac home users), or risk allowing the malware problem on Macs to become as big as the problem on PCs in the future.”

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Worm attacks Iranian oil ministry

Organisations including the Iranian Ministry of Petroleum and the National Iranian Oil Company were the target of a computer worm attack on Sunday, according to the Mehr news agency.

Read this

Ten computer viruses that changed the world

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“The cyberattack disrupted internet access at the aforementioned organisations and companies, and the relevant officials are investigating the issue,” a Mehr article said on Monday.

Mehr reported that the worm was detected before it could infect systems.

However, the Iranian Ministry of Petroleum said in a statement on Monday that an attack had succeeded in stealing data from non-essential systems.

Iran disconnected its main oil terminal, Kharg Island, from the internet as a result of the cyberattack, AFP reported on Monday. Other facilities were also disconnected, said AFP.

In February 2011, ZDNet UK’s sister site CNET News reported that Iran was probably the subject of the Stuxnet worm attack that targeted nuclear facilities.

The National Iranian Oil Company had not responded to a request for comment at the time of writing.

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Worm attacks Iranian oil ministry

Organisations including the Iranian Ministry of Petroleum and the National Iranian Oil Company were the target of a computer worm attack on Sunday, according to the Mehr news agency.

Read this

Ten computer viruses that changed the world

Read more

“The cyberattack disrupted internet access at the aforementioned organisations and companies, and the relevant officials are investigating the issue,” a Mehr article said on Monday.

Mehr reported that the worm was detected before it could infect systems.

However, the Iranian Ministry of Petroleum said in a statement on Monday that an attack had succeeded in stealing data from non-essential systems.

Iran disconnected its main oil terminal, Kharg Island, from the internet as a result of the cyberattack, AFP reported on Monday. Other facilities were also disconnected, said AFP.

In February 2011, ZDNet UK’s sister site CNET News reported that Iran was probably the subject of the Stuxnet worm attack that targeted nuclear facilities.

The National Iranian Oil Company had not responded to a request for comment at the time of writing.

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

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