blog trackingRealtime Web Statistics Distribution Archives - Gregory D. Evans | Worlds No. 1 Security Consultant

Posts Tagged ‘Distribution’

Beware of Valentine’s Day Malware Distribution Campaigns, Warns Aware Bear Computer Repair

Aware Bear Computer Repair, a local Rochester New York computer repair store located on 5 Monroe Avenue in Pittsford New York (585) 473-7035, today warned consumers to be aware of suspicious links, emails and messages as Valentine’s Day approaches. As in previous years, there are already numerous emails in circulation with links for downloading romantic greeting cards, videos, gift ideas, and Facebook and Twitter messages related to Valentine’s Day.

Rochester, New York (PRWEB) February 13, 2012

“Social networking sites are the cyber pirates preferred technique for deceiving users, primarily obtaining confidential information from users by convincing them to take a series of actions. This includes credit card information, personal data and bank related information used for identity theft and other cyber crimes” mentions Andre Alves from Rochester New York, Andre is the owner and founder of Aware Bear Computer Repair.

Cyber pirates are also exploiting other channels such as Facebook, Twitter or Google+, Myspace, Orkut and with their access to millions of users that these social networks websites. These websites have become just as popular among the online criminal community for spreading malware and spyware. Malware and Spyware are forms of viruses that install into a computer and record the users’ activity; later these programs send a log back to the original online thief that has enough information to start doing identity theft and other online crimes.

A new Facebook virus attack that takes advantage of users’ walls to spread has recently been discovered. “An apparently harmless message invites users to install a Valentine’s Day theme on Facebook but when the user clicks the wall post, they are redirected to a page where they are prompted to install the theme. This installs a malware file which, once run, displays ads from other websites. It also downloads an extension that monitors Web activities and redirects sessions to survey pages that request sensitive information like phone numbers” mentions Panda Antivirus Software.

Aware Bear Computer Repair blog previously reported on a suspicious Black Friday virus going around many computers and doing identity theft. This virus was being spread by social media sites and also by email messages. Following are several examples of Valentine’s Day-themed malware campaigns detected by Aware Bear Computer Repair in recent years using the Panda Antivirus Software:

“Waledac.C: This worm, spread by email, tried to pass itself off as a greeting card and included a malicious link to access it. If the user clicked the link and accepted the subsequent file download, they were allowed the Waledac.C worm into their computer. Once it infected the computer, the worm used the affected user’s email to send out spam.

I Love.exe you: This was a RAT (Remote Access Trojan) that gave attackers access to the victim’s computer and all their personal information. The Trojan allowed the virus creator to access target computers remotely, steal passwords and manage files.

Nuwar.OL: This worm spread in email messages with subjects like “I Love You So Much,” “Inside My Heart” or “You in My Dreams.” The text of the email included a link to a website that downloaded the malicious code. The page was very simple and looked like a romantic greeting card with a large pink heart. Once it infected a computer, the worm sent out a large amount of emails, creating a heavy load on networks and slowing down computers. Following is a screenshot of a website that downloaded the Nuwar.OL worm: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/NuwarOL.jpg

Valentin.E: This worm spread by email with subjects like “Searching for True Love” or “True Love” and an attached file called “friends4u.” If the targeted user opened the file, a copy of the worm was downloaded. The worm then sent out emails with copies of itself from the infected computer to spread and infect more users. Following is a screenshot of the desktop wallpaper displayed by Valentin.E: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Valentin.E.jpg

Storm Worm: This worm spread via email by employing a number of lures, one of them exploiting Valentine’s Day. If the targeted user clicked the link in the email, a Web page was displayed while the worm was downloaded in the background. Following is a screenshot of the web page displayed by Storm Worm: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/STORMWORM.jpg” according to PandaLabs virus scan logs.

PandaLabs offers computer users a series of tips to avoid falling victim to computer threats:

  • Do not open emails or messages received on social networks from unknown senders.
  • Do not click any links included in email messages, even though they may come from reliable sources. It is better to type the URL directly in the browser. This rule applies to messages received through any mail client, as well as those in Facebook, Twitter, or other social networks or messaging applications, etc. If you do click on any such links, take a close look at the page you arrive at and if you don’t recognize it, close your browser.
  • Do not run attached files that come from unknown sources. Stay on alert for files that claim to be Valentine Day’s greeting cards, romantic videos, etc.
  • Even if the page seems legitimate, but asks you to download something, you should be suspicious and not accept the download. If you download and install any type of executable file and you begin to see unusual messages on your computer, you have likely been infected with malware.
  • If you are making any purchases online, type the address of the store in the browser, rather than going through any links that have been sent to you. Only buy online from sites that have a solid reputation and offer secure transactions, encrypting all information that is entered in the page.
  • Do not use shared or public computers or an unsecured WiFi connection for making transactions or operations that require you to enter passwords or other personal details.
  • Have an effective security solution installed, capable of detecting both known and new malware strains.

About Aware Bear Computer Repair in Rochester New York:

Aware Bear Computer Repair is a local Rochester New York computer repair company located in the Historical Village of Pittsford New York. Aware Bear specializes in virus and spyware removals, wireless network security and computer support for home users and businesses. For more information please visit: http://awarebear.com or http://awarebear.com/blog. Become a fan of Aware Bear Computer Repair on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Aware.Bear.Computers.Rochester.NY

About PandaLabs:

Since 1990, PandaLabs, Panda Security’s malware research laboratory, has been working to detect and classify malware in order to protect consumers and companies against new Internet threats. To do so, PandaLabs uses Collective Intelligence, a cloud-based proprietary system that leverages the knowledge gathered from Panda’s user community to automatically detect, analyze and classify the more than 73,000 new malware strains that appear every day. This automated malware classification is complemented through the work of an international team with researchers specialized each in a specific type of malware (viruses, worms, Trojans, spyware and other attacks) to provide global coverage. Get more information about PandaLabs and subscribe to its blog news feed at http://www.pandalabs.com/es. Follow Panda on Twitter at http://twitter.com/Panda_Security and on Facebook at http://www.facebook/PandaSecurity.

###

Andre Alves
Aware Bear Inc.
(585) 473-7035
Email Information

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/beware-valentines-day-malware-distribution-campaigns-warns-aware-231613293.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Beware of Valentine’s Day Malware Distribution Campaigns, Warns PandaLabs

Malware campaigns primarily using social engineering for distribution around this heart-filled holiday

ORLANDO, FLA. (PRWEB) February 08, 2012

PandaLabs, Panda Security’s anti-malware laboratory, today warned consumers to be aware of suspicious links, emails and messages as Valentine’s Day approaches. As in previous years, there are already numerous emails in circulation with links for downloading romantic greeting cards, videos, gift ideas, and Facebook and Twitter messages related to Valentine’s Day.

Social engineering is the cyber-crook’s preferred technique for deceiving users, primarily obtaining confidential information from users by convincing them to take a series of actions. Crimeware and social engineering go hand-in-hand: a carefully selected social engineering ploy convinces users to hand over their data or install a malicious program which captures information and sends it to the fraudsters.

Cyber-crooks are also exploiting other channels such as Facebook, Twitter or Google+, and with their access to millions of users that these social networks provide, they have become just as popular among the criminal fraternity for spreading malware. A new Facebook attack that takes advantage of users’ walls to spread has recently been discovered. An apparently harmless message invites users to install a Valentine’s Day theme on Facebook but when the user clicks the wall post, they are redirected to a page where they are prompted to install the theme. This installs a malware file which, once run, displays ads from other websites. It also downloads an extension that monitors Web activities and redirects sessions to survey pages that request sensitive information like phone numbers.

The PandaLabs blog previously reported on a suspicious Twitter profile that took users to a particular dating site. PandaLabs predicts that special occasions like Valentine’s Day will bear witness to a proliferation of malicious Twitter posts used to steal users’ confidential data and empty their bank accounts through social engineering.

Following are several examples of Valentine’s Day-themed malware campaigns detected by PandaLabs in recent years:

Waledac.C: This worm, spread by email, tried to pass itself off as a greeting card and included a malicious link to access it. If the user clicked the link and accepted the subsequent file download, they were allowed the Waledac.C worm into their computer. Once it infected the computer, the worm used the affected user’s email to send out spam.

I Love.exe you: This was a RAT (Remote Access Trojan) that gave attackers access to the victim’s computer and all their personal information. The Trojan allowed the virus creator to access target computers remotely, steal passwords and manage files.

Nuwar.OL: This worm spread in email messages with subjects like “I Love You So Much,” “Inside My Heart” or “You in My Dreams.” The text of the email included a link to a website that downloaded the malicious code. The page was very simple and looked like a romantic greeting card with a large pink heart. Once it infected a computer, the worm sent out a large amount of emails, creating a heavy load on networks and slowing down computers. Following is a screenshot of a website that downloaded the Nuwar.OL worm: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/NuwarOL.jpg

Valentin.E: This worm spread by email with subjects like “Searching for True Love” or “True Love” and an attached file called “friends4u.” If the targeted user opened the file, a copy of the worm was downloaded. The worm then sent out emails with copies of itself from the infected computer to spread and infect more users. Following is a screenshot of the desktop wallpaper displayed by Valentin.E: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Valentin.E.jpg

Storm Worm: This worm spread via email by employing a number of lures, one of them exploiting Valentine’s Day. If the targeted user clicked the link in the email, a Web page was displayed while the worm was downloaded in the background. Following is a screenshot of the web page displayed by Storm Worm: http://prensa.pandasecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/STORMWORM.jpg

PandaLabs offers users a series of tips to avoid falling victim to computer threats:

  •     Do not open emails or messages received on social networks from unknown senders.

  •     Do not click any links included in email messages, even though they may come from reliable sources. It is better to type the URL directly in the browser. This rule applies to messages received through any mail client, as well as those in Facebook, Twitter, or other social networks or messaging applications, etc. If you do click on any such links, take a close look at the page you arrive at and if you don’t recognize it, close your browser.

  •     Do not run attached files that come from unknown sources. Stay on alert for files that claim to be Valentine Day’s greeting cards, romantic videos, etc.
  •     Even if the page seems legitimate, but asks you to download something, you should be suspicious and not accept the download. If you download and install any type of executable file and you begin to see unusual messages on your computer, you have likely been infected with malware.
  •     If you are making any purchases online, type the address of the store in the browser, rather than going through any links that have been sent to you. Only buy online from sites that have a solid reputation and offer secure transactions, encrypting all information that is entered in the page.
  •     Do not use shared or public computers or an unsecured WiFi connection for making transactions or operations that require you to enter passwords or other personal details.
  •     Have an effective security solution installed, capable of detecting both known and new malware strains.

Panda Security offers several free tools for scanning computers for malware, like Panda Cloud Antivirus: http://www.cloudantivirus.com. More information is available in the PandaLabs blog: http://pandalabs.pandasecurity.com.

About PandaLabs

Since 1990, PandaLabs, Panda Security’s malware research laboratory, has been working to detect and classify malware in order to protect consumers and companies against new Internet threats. To do so, PandaLabs uses Collective Intelligence, a cloud-based proprietary system that leverages the knowledge gathered from Panda’s user community to automatically detect, analyze and classify the more than 73,000 new malware strains that appear every day. This automated malware classification is complemented through the work of an international team with researchers specialized each in a specific type of malware (viruses, worms, Trojans, spyware and other attacks) to provide global coverage. Get more information about PandaLabs and subscribe to its blog news feed at http://www.pandalabs.com/es. Follow Panda on Twitter at http://twitter.com/Panda_Security and on Facebook at http://www.facebook/PandaSecurity.

Jeana Tahnk
jtahnk@bateman-group.com
609-240-5385
Email Information

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/beware-valentines-day-malware-distribution-campaigns-warns-pandalabs-164210359.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Brazoria County Woman Sentenced to Prison for Distribution of Child Pornography

HOUSTON—Carrie Louise Kelly, 31, has been sentenced to five years in federal prison for distribution of child pornography, United States Attorney Kenneth Magidson announced today. U.S. District Judge Sim Lake sentenced Kelly this afternoon to the 60-month term of imprisonment to be followed by 25 years of supervised release.

Kelly pleaded guilty on March 2, 2011.

On April 13, 2010, an FBI undercover agent in Oklahoma City used a file-sharing program to search for child pornography, at which time he found a computer which had numerous images and video files depicting child pornography available for sharing. The agent downloaded 10 files (nine images and one video) and, when reviewed, all files contained child pornography. The next day, in Rochester, N.Y., another agent also used a file sharing program to search for child pornography and observed a computer also making numerous images and video files depicting child pornography available for sharing. 45 files were downloaded and reviewed which were all found to contain child pornography. In both instances, the computer in question was associated with Kelly.

On April 23, 2010, an undercover officer in Boynton Beach, Fla., also downloaded images from Kelly’s computer and contacted officers with the Richwood, Texas, Police Department who prepared and executed a state search warrant on April 28, 2010, at Kelly’s residence. At that time, officers seized two Dell laptop computers. A forensic exam was conducted and a total of 3368 images and 178 videos containing child pornography were located. Kelly admitted to being the one that was downloading child pornography from the Internet.

The charges against Kelly were the result of an investigation conducted by the FBI along with the Richwood and Pearland, Texas, Police Departments. Kelly has been detained in federal custody since her arrest where she will remain pending transfer to a Bureau of Prisons facility to be determined in the near future.

This case, prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Stabe, was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

View full post on National Cyber Security

Google Safe Browsing extends alerts service to malware distribution domains

Google has extended its Safe Browsing alerts for network administrators to include domains that host malware or exploits in addition to compromised websites and phishing pages.

Google Safe Browsing is a service that aggregates information about malicious URLs from various sources, including a fleet of specialised content-crawling robots operated by the Internet search giant.

Google originally designed this service to alert its search engine users about results that could lead to potentially harmful websites. However, since the Safe Browsing API (application programming interface) is open source, the collected data is also leveraged by other software projects, including Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, to block malicious URLs.

Website owners can use Google’s Webmaster Tools to check if their website is added to the Safe Browsing blacklists and even receive samples of the malicious content detected by the company’s crawlers.

In September 2010, Google extended the Safe Browsing alerting service to network administrators, arguing that while network administrators don’t necessarily own all of the websites hosted on their networks, they are interested in keeping their IP spaces clean of malicious activity.

The service began notifying registered Autonomous Systems (AS) owners via email and later Google added phishing URLs and the ability to receive information in XML format to the feature list.

The new change announced by Google on Thursday allows network admins to differentiate between websites that had malicious code injected into their pages and those that are actually used to host malware or exploits.

“Unlike compromised sites, which are often run by innocent webmasters, distribution domains are set up with the primary purpose of serving malicious content,” Nav Jagpal, a member of Google’s security team, explained in a blog post.

The ability to differentiate between different types of malicious URLs helps network administrators to determine quicker what is the best course of action; whether they should contact the website owner and ask them to clean their site or suspend the website immediately.

Network admins who want to receive such alerts need to register as AS owners through a special form on the Google Safe Browsing website.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/470440/s/1aacf713/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Cmobile0Ewireless0C33228320Cgoogle0Esafe0Ebrowsing0Eextends0Ealerts0Eservice0Emalware0Edistribution0Edomains0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

Google Safe Browsing Alerts Network Admins About Malware Distribution Domains

Google has extended its Safe Browsing alerts for network administrators to include domains that host malware or exploits in addition to compromised websites and phishing pages.

Google Safe Browsing is a service that aggregates information about malicious URLs from various sources, including a fleet of specialized content-crawling robots operated by the Internet search giant.

Google originally designed this service to alert its search engine users about results that could lead to potentially harmful websites. However, since the Safe Browsing API (application programming interface) is open source, the collected data is also leveraged by other software projects, including Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, to block malicious URLs.

Website owners can use Google’s Webmaster Tools to check if their website is added to the Safe Browsing blacklists and even receive samples of the malicious content detected by the company’s crawlers.

In September 2010, Google extended the Safe Browsing alerting service to network administrators, arguing that while network administrators don’t necessarily own all of the websites hosted on their networks, they are interested in keeping their IP spaces clean of malicious activity.

The service began notifying registered Autonomous Systems (AS) owners via email and later Google added phishing URLs and the ability to receive information in XML format to the feature list.

The new change announced by Google on Thursday allows network admins to differentiate between websites that had malicious code injected into their pages and those that are actually used to host malware or exploits.

“Unlike compromised sites, which are often run by innocent webmasters, distribution domains are set up with the primary purpose of serving malicious content,” Nav Jagpal, a member of Google’s security team, explained in a blog post.

The ability to differentiate between different types of malicious URLs helps network administrators to determine quicker what is the best course of action; whether they should contact the website owner and ask them to clean their site or suspend the website immediately.

Network admins who want to receive such alerts need to register as AS owners through a special form on the Google Safe Browsing website.

Would you recommend this story?

YES
NO

  • Recommend:
  • 0 Comments
  • Print

Google Safe Browsing Alerts Network Admins About Malware Distribution Domains, Blog, Distribution, network, Google, about, malware, domains, alerts, safe, Browsing, Admins
Leave a commentSubmit Comment

Once you click submit you will be asked to sign in or register an account if you are not already a member.

Posting comment …



Trade in your old printer save! A new Xerox ColorQube® can increase print quality and reduce costs. Start saving today.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/245373/google_safe_browsing_alerts_network_admins_about_malware_distribution_domains.html

View full post on National Cyber Security » Virus/Malware/Worms

LIGATT: LSI SIGNS WITH N. AMERICA’S COMPUTER PRODUCT DISTRIBUTOR, D & H DISTRIBUTION. http://www.ligattsecurity.com/investor-relations/press-room

LIGATT: LSI SIGNS WITH N. AMERICA’S COMPUTER PRODUCT DISTRIBUTOR, D & H DISTRIBUTION. http://www.ligattsecurity.com/investor-relations/press-room

View full post on Twitter / LIGATT

Gergory Evans

LIGATT Security Signs With North America’s Premier Computer Product Distributor, D & H Distribution

ATLANTA, GA-Oct. 6, 2010 – LIGATT Security International, (OTC: LGTT) a cyber security company, announced today that they have signed with D & H Distributing, one of the nation’s leading technology distributors. LSI will utilize the expertise of D & H in order to expand their reach to the marketplace. As a premiere distributor of [...]LIGATT Security Signs With North America’s Premier Computer Product Distributor, D & H Distribution, Blog, computer, LIGATT, Security, North, Premier, Product, Distributor, Distribution

View full post on LIGATT Security International

Gregory Evans | LinkedIn

Interview With Gregory Evans

Gregory Evans Security Expert

Gregory Evans on Cyber Crime

Get The New Book By Gregory Evans

Everyone Is Talking About!

Are You Hacker Proof?
$15.95

Find Out More, Click Here!